Republicans are on the cusp of winning the Senate majority after netting five seats overall and defeating two Democratic incumbents in Colorado and Arkansas.

The GOP needs to gain six seats to take the majority, and the party has pickup opportunities on the board in Iowa, Alaska and Virginia, where Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerHillicon Valley: Apple, Barr clash over Pensacola shooter's phone | Senate bill would boost Huawei alternatives | DHS orders agencies to fix Microsoft vulnerability | Chrome to phase out tracking cookies Senators offer bill to create alternatives to Huawei in 5G tech Sen. Warner calls on State Department to take measures to protect against cyberattacks MORE (D) is narrowly ahead of Republican Ed Gillespie in a suprisingly tight race.

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Republicans have already picked up open seats in West Virginia, South Dakota and Montana, and they held on to a seat in Georgia, with David Perdue defeating surging Democrat Michelle Nunn without having to go to a January runoff. 

Vulnerable Kansas Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsSenate GOP hopes to move new NAFTA deal before impeachment trial The Hill's Morning Report - Worries about war in world capitals, Congress Pompeo tells McConnell he's not running for Senate MORE (R) also held on, beating back a vigorous challenge from Independent Greg Orman. 

Several late-closing states will prove crucial. Alaska Sen. Mark BegichMark Peter BegichAlaska political mess has legislators divided over meeting place Former GOP chairman Royce joins lobbying shop Lobbying world MORE (D) is seeking to hold off Republican Dan Sullivan, and it’s possible a close result in the sparsely populated state will lead to a recount or a very late call well into Wednesday. 

Arkansas Sen. Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorTom Cotton's only Democratic rival quits race in Arkansas Medicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation MORE (D) was the first incumbent to fall on Tuesday. Freshman Rep. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonHillicon Valley: Lawmakers say Facebook deepfake ban falls short | House passes bills to win 5G race | Feds sound alarm on cyberthreat from Iran | Ivanka Trump appearance at tech show sparks backlash Cotton introduces bill blocking intel sharing with countries relying on Huawei for 5G GOP senators introduce resolution to change rules, dismiss impeachment without articles MORE (R) handily defeated the centrist lawmaker in a state that has slipped rapidly away from Democrats in recent years.

Colorado Rep. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerRepublicans will pay on Election Day for politicizing Trump's impeachment Koch network could target almost 200 races in 2020, official says Hickenlooper raised .8 million for Colorado Senate bid in fourth quarter of 2019 MORE (R) also knocked off Sen. Mark UdallMark Emery UdallDemocrats will win back the Senate majority in 2020, all thanks to President Trump Poll: Trump trails three Democrats by 10 points in Colorado The Hill's Morning Report — Trump and the new Israel-'squad' controversy MORE (D), defying Democratic cries that their vaunted ground game would save the vulnerable incumbent. 

Republicans also picked up a Democrat-held open seat in West Virginia with Rep. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoDemocrat Richard Ojeda announces Senate bid after dropping out of presidential race Spending bill to address miners' health care, pensions Manchin warns he'll slow-walk government funding bill until he gets deal on miners legislation MORE's (R) easy victory. 

South Dakota flipped to the GOP column after former Gov. Mike Rounds (R) won the open seat of retiring Democratic Sen. Tim JohnsonTimothy (Tim) Peter JohnsonTrump faces tough path to Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac overhaul Several hurt when truck runs into minimum wage protesters in Michigan Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation MORE (D). The three-way race had become a late headache for the GOP with the addition of former GOP Sen. Larry Pressler (I), but with Republican attention and help the race turned again in its favor. 

Rep. Steve Daines (R) then won the open Democratic-held seat in Montana. 

With the early victories, Republicans are on the brink of their goal of Senate control. 

Sen. Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHawley expects McConnell's final impeachment resolution to give White House defense ability to motion to dismiss Democrats file brief against Trump, 'the Framers' worst nightmare' Iran resolution supporters fear impeachment will put it on back burner MORE (R-Ky.) was declared the victor in his closely watched race as soon as polls closed in the Bluegrass State, defeating Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes to earn a sixth term. Democrats had early hopes for the Kentucky secretary of State's candidacy, but her campaign couldn't take advantage of the senator's unpopularity in the state. 

McConnell might have to wait a bit longer to see whether he can add Senate majority leader to his title, however. 

A victor in the fight for the Senate majority may not be named until early Wednesday morning — or perhaps not even until December though. In Louisiana, there will be a runoff in December between Sen. Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuA decade of making a difference: Senate Caucus on Foster Youth Congress needs to work to combat the poverty, abuse and neglect issues that children face Dems wrestle over how to vote on ‘Green New Deal’ MORE (D) and Rep. Bill Cassidy (R). Cassidy is seen to have an edge in the GOP-leaning state.  

There was good news for Democrats early on Tuesday too. Polls closed in North Carolina at 7:30 p.m., where Sen. Kay HaganKay Ruthven HaganGOP braces for Democratic spending onslaught in battle for Senate Democrats will win back the Senate majority in 2020, all thanks to President Trump The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Better Medicare Alliance - Dems shift strategy on impeachment vote MORE (D) was clinging to a narrow lead over Republican state Speaker Thom Tillis.

In New Hampshire, Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne Shaheen2020 forecast: A House switch, a slimmer Senate for GOP — and a bigger win for Trump Lewandowski decides against Senate bid Biden would consider Republican for VP 'but I can't think of one right now' MORE (D) was able to hold the seat from challenger former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown (R), though the Republicans was refusing to concede late Tuesday as the race had tightened after the networks initially called the race for the incumbent. 

— Updated at 11:07 p.m.