Five senators up for reelection in 2014 bucked their parties in the Senate’s procedural vote on gun control Thursday.

Both Democrats who voted against the motion face reelection next year in states President Obama lost in the 2012 presidential election: Sens. Mark BegichMark Peter BegichAlaska political mess has legislators divided over meeting place Former GOP chairman Royce joins lobbying shop Lobbying world MORE (Alaska) and Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.).

Three of the 16 Republicans who voted in favor of the motion face reelection next year: Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsPoll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers struggle to understand Facebook's Libra project | EU hits Amazon with antitrust probe | New cybersecurity concerns over census | Robocall, election security bills head to House floor | Privacy questions over FaceApp Trump angry more Republicans haven't defended his tweets: report MORE (Maine), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham says he will call Papadopoulos to testify GOP group defends Mueller ahead of testimony The Hill's Morning Report — Mueller Time: Dems, GOP ready questions for high-stakes testimony MORE (S.C.) and Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderFinding a path forward to end surprise medical billing The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - Trump attack on progressive Dems draws sharp rebuke Republicans make U-turn on health care MORE (Tenn.).

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Wednesday’s motion was a procedural vote that doesn’t even formally begin debate on the gun control measure, but it was still a politically touchy vote.

President Obama and gun control advocates pressed for the vote, while the National Rifle Association warned it would negatively score the votes of any senator who voted to proceed on the issue.

Democrats up for reelection in red states next year who voted with their party and against the NRA include Sens. Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuCongress needs to work to combat the poverty, abuse and neglect issues that children face Dems wrestle over how to vote on ‘Green New Deal’ Lobbying world MORE (La.), Kay HaganKay Ruthven HaganTillis trails Democratic challenger by 7 points in North Carolina poll North Carolina businessman will challenge Tillis in GOP primary Embattled senators fill coffers ahead of 2020 MORE (N.C.) and Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusOvernight Defense: McCain honored in Capitol ceremony | Mattis extends border deployment | Trump to embark on four-country trip after midterms Congress gives McCain the highest honor Judge boots Green Party from Montana ballot in boost to Tester MORE (Mont.).

Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioAna Navarro lashes out at Rubio for calling outrage over Trump's 'go back' tweet 'self righteous' US-Saudi Arabia policy needs a dose of 'realpolitik' Media cried wolf: Calling every Republican a racist lost its bite MORE (Fla.) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump applauds two-year budget deal with 0 billion spending hike The Hill's Morning Report — Mueller Time: Dems, GOP ready questions for high-stakes testimony This week: Mueller dominates chaotic week on Capitol Hill MORE (Texas) both carried through on their promise to vote against the motion. Both are possible presidential contenders in 2016, and their votes against the motion could fire up GOP primary voters.

Though in a general election, the votes against moving toward a debate on gun control could open them up to attacks.

Both Democrats who voted with the NRA are top political targets for Republicans.

A recent poll funded by the Club for Growth found Pryor behind potential challenger Rep. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonLawmakers introduce bill to block U.S. companies from doing business with Huawei Five things to know about Iran's breaches of the nuclear deal Hillicon Valley: Trump gets pushback after reversing course on Huawei | China installing surveillance apps on visitors' phones | Internet provider Cloudflare suffers outage | Consumer groups look to stop Facebook cryptocurrency MORE (R ) by 10 percentage points.

In Alaska, polls suggest Begich is vulnerable, and he already has one prominent potential opponent in Lt. Gov. Mead Treadwell, who recently opened an exploratory committee to look into a bid.

Landrieu is also considered vulnerable but has exhibited a willingness to buck the red-state Democratic trend of showing independence by voting against her party on controversial measures.

On Thursday, she reported raising $1.2 million in the first quarter, which may be boosting her confidence. On the GOP side, Collins is running in a state easily won in 2012 by Obama and where legislators are considering a suite of gun control bills. The president's advocacy arm, Organizing for Action, has targeted her with ads on gun control.

Alexander's vote indicates he feels safe. Though he initially looked vulnerable to a primary challenge, the senator roped nearly the entire Tennessee delegation into his reelection campaign.

No strong candidates have emerged yet to take on Graham, either. He’s repeatedly shown he’s not afraid to vote against conservatives, and he criticized Paul’s recent filibuster on U.S. drone policy.