Rep. Dave Camp (R-Mich.) on Friday announced he won't run for the Senate in 2014, denying the GOP a top recruit for the open-seat race.

"After much thought and careful consideration, I have decided not to run for the United States Senate," Camp said in a statement. "I will continue to put my full focus and effort on serving my constituents in mid- and northern-Michigan as their representative and as chairman of the Ways and Means Committee."

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Camp had said he was considering a run for retiring Sen. Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinListen, learn and lead: Congressional newcomers should leave the extremist tactics at home House Democrats poised to set a dangerous precedent with president’s tax returns The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — White House to 'temporarily reinstate' Acosta's press pass after judge issues order | Graham to take over Judiciary panel | Hand recount for Florida Senate race MORE's (D-Mich.) seat, exciting Republicans in Michigan who had grown pessimistic about their party's chances in the race.

The decision hurts Republicans' odds of winning Senate control. Michigan, along with Iowa, will be their best chance to expand the map by winning open seats in swing states, but they've struggled with recruiting in both places.

If Republicans fail to win the seats in Iowa and Michigan, they would need to defeat three of four Democratic incumbents in red states in order to win Senate control.

Democrats have rallied around Rep. Gary Peters (D-Mich.), while the top Republican option at this point is former Secretary of State Terri Lynn Land (R), who has failed to excite many Republicans.

Camp's decision could bolster his push for tax reform with Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusOvernight Defense: McCain honored in Capitol ceremony | Mattis extends border deployment | Trump to embark on four-country trip after midterms Congress gives McCain the highest honor Judge boots Green Party from Montana ballot in boost to Tester MORE (R-Mont.). Mounting a statewide campaign would have likely required Camp to spend more time away from his role as chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, which is crafting tax reform legislation. 

— This story was updated at 10:52 a.m.