A pair of Republican senators reiterated their call for postponing a vote on President Obama's new nominee for attorney general until the new Congress begins, rather than lame-duck session.

Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOn The Money: Conservative blocks disaster relief bill | Trade high on agenda as Trump heads to Japan | Boeing reportedly faces SEC probe over 737 Max | Study finds CEO pay rising twice as fast as worker pay Conservative blocks House passage of disaster relief bill The Hill's Morning Report — After contentious week, Trump heads for Japan MORE (R-Texas) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOn The Money: Senate passes disaster aid bill after deal with Trump | Trump to offer B aid package for farmers | House votes to boost retirement savings | Study says new tariffs to double costs for consumers Senate passes disaster aid bill after deal with Trump Hillicon Valley: Google delays cutting off Huawei | GOP senators split over breaking up big tech | Report finds DNC lagging behind RNC on cybersecurity MORE (R-Utah) have previously said they will oppose non-emergency business when lawmakers return following Tuesday's election. 

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"President Obama’s Attorney General nominee deserves fair and full consideration of the United States Senate, which is precisely why she should not be confirmed in the lame duck session of Congress by senators who just lost their seats and are no longer accountable to the voters," the lawmakers said in a statement. 

The two suggested, however, they could oppose Loretta Lynch's nomination regardless of the timing based on her position on Obama's forthcoming executive action on immigration. They said an attorney general must have a "full and complete commitment to the law."

"Loretta Lynch deserves the opportunity to demonstrate those qualities, beginning with a statement whether or not she believes the President’s executive amnesty plans are constitutional and legal," they said. 

Republicans are slated to take control of the upper chamber when the new session begins in January. However, lawmakers will return for the final few months of businesses of the current session next week. Democrats have not yet outlined the timing for Lynch's confirmation. 

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump orders more troops to Mideast amid Iran tensions What if 2020 election is disputed? Immigration bills move forward amid political upheaval MORE (R-Ky.) has also said the nomination should be handled in the next Congress. 

A host of other nominations, a spending bill, and other legislation are already expected to be taken up in the lame duck.