A group of five Republican senators on Thursday introduced legislation that would restrict those who live in Ebola-stricken countries from traveling to the United States, while allowing exceptions for some aid workers and foreign military members.

People who live in countries designated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as having “widespread transmission of Ebola” would not be able to receive a visa to enter the United States, under the bill. Aid workers and foreign military authorized by the United States Agency for International Development and the Defense Department would be exempt. 

“To protect our security, we must stop Ebola at its source,” Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyBiden's bipartisan deal faces Senate gauntlet The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - US gymnast wins all-around gold as Simone Biles cheers from the stands The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - A huge win for Biden, centrist senators MORE (R-Iowa) said in a statement. “The best way to make this happen is to cease issuing visas or restricting entry to people from countries that are most impacted.”

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Grassley added that, “these countries simply don’t have the standards in place to properly screen travelers entering the United States.”

He is joined by Republican Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSenate holds sleepy Saturday session as negotiators finalize infrastructure deal Break glass in case of emergency — but not for climate change Democrats join GOP in pressuring Biden over China, virus origins MORE (Fla.), Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsBob Dole, Pat Roberts endorse Kansas AG Derek Schmidt for governor Ex-Sen. Cory Gardner joins lobbying firm Senate GOP faces retirement brain drain MORE (Kan.), John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneBiden's bipartisan deal faces Senate gauntlet Senate votes to take up infrastructure deal Senators say they have deal on 'major issues' in infrastructure talks MORE (S.D.) and Mark KirkMark Steven KirkDuckworth announces reelection bid Brave new world: Why we need a Senate Human Rights Commission  Senate majority battle snags Biden Cabinet hopefuls MORE (Ill.). All five senators, along with a slew of other lawmakers, have previously called for a travel ban. But the White House has resisted those calls and said that a ban could be counterproductive, encouraging travelers to lie about exposure to the virus.

Citing State Department figures, Grassley noted that the U.S. issued more than 6,300 visas to people from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea from March until September 27. Those three countries would meet the guidelines for a travel ban under the bill and have been battling the current Ebola outbreak since March. 

Residents would be able to receive visas 60 days after the CDC says the virus is no longer rampant in their home country.