A group of five Republican senators on Thursday introduced legislation that would restrict those who live in Ebola-stricken countries from traveling to the United States, while allowing exceptions for some aid workers and foreign military members.

People who live in countries designated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as having “widespread transmission of Ebola” would not be able to receive a visa to enter the United States, under the bill. Aid workers and foreign military authorized by the United States Agency for International Development and the Defense Department would be exempt. 

“To protect our security, we must stop Ebola at its source,” Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyFive takeaways from the court decision striking down ObamaCare The Year Ahead: Tough tests loom for Trump trade agenda Senate heads toward floor fight on criminal justice bill MORE (R-Iowa) said in a statement. “The best way to make this happen is to cease issuing visas or restricting entry to people from countries that are most impacted.”

Grassley added that, “these countries simply don’t have the standards in place to properly screen travelers entering the United States.”

He is joined by Republican Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioKevin McLaughlin tapped to serve as NRSC executive director for 2020 Senate votes to end US support for Saudi war, bucking Trump Senators offer measure naming Saudi crown prince 'responsible' for Khashoggi slaying MORE (Fla.), Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsSenate approves massive farm bill The Hill's Morning Report — Will Trump strike a deal with Chuck and Nancy? This week: Trump, Dems set to meet amid funding fight MORE (Kan.), John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneHillicon Valley — Presented by AT&T — New momentum for privacy legislation | YouTube purges spam videos | Apple plans B Austin campus | Iranian hackers targeted Treasury officials | FEC to let lawmakers use campaign funds for cyber The Year Ahead: Push for privacy bill gains new momentum On The Money: Trump, Dems battle over border wall before cameras | Clash ups odds of shutdown | Senators stunned by Trump's shutdown threat | Pelosi calls wall 'a manhood thing' for Trump MORE (S.D.) and Mark KirkMark Steven KirkDems vow swift action on gun reform next year This week: Trump heads to Capitol Hill Trump attending Senate GOP lunch Tuesday MORE (Ill.). All five senators, along with a slew of other lawmakers, have previously called for a travel ban. But the White House has resisted those calls and said that a ban could be counterproductive, encouraging travelers to lie about exposure to the virus.

Citing State Department figures, Grassley noted that the U.S. issued more than 6,300 visas to people from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea from March until September 27. Those three countries would meet the guidelines for a travel ban under the bill and have been battling the current Ebola outbreak since March. 

Residents would be able to receive visas 60 days after the CDC says the virus is no longer rampant in their home country.