Rep. Pete King (R-N.Y.) is urging President Obama to invite Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson to the White House, after a grand jury decided not to bring charges against him in a case that has captured the nation's attention. 

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"I think it would be very helpful if President Obama went and met with the police officer, or invited him to the White House and said, you’ve gone through four months of smear and slander, and the least we can do is tell you that it’s unfortunate that it happened and thank you for doing your job," King said Tuesday on Fox Business.

King is known as a defender of the police and of robust national security measures. He criticized the way Wilson has been portrayed in the shooting death of Michael Brown, a black teenager who was unarmed.

"I thought it was terrible how, over the last four months, a narrative was put out there by our national leaders and many in the media presuming that the police officer was guilty," King said.

Obama spoke on Monday night after the announcement of the grand jury's decision, calling for protests to be peaceful.

"I wish he had said one good word about the police, one good word about Officer Wilson, who has gone through all this," King said of Obama's remarks.

Obama did say that "police officers put their lives on the line for us every single day."

There is some precedent for a police officer visiting the White House. In 2009, Obama invited Cambridge, Mass., police officer James Crowley to meet with him and Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates after a racially charged controversy over Gates's arrest at his house.

Asked on Monday night if he would travel to Ferguson, Obama said, "Let’s take a look and see how things are going."