Sen. Angus KingAngus Stanley KingOn The Money: Economy adds 75K jobs in May | GOP senator warns tariffs will wipe out tax cuts | Trump says 'good chance' of deal with Mexico On The Money: Economy adds 75K jobs in May | GOP senator warns tariffs will wipe out tax cuts | Trump says 'good chance' of deal with Mexico Trump administration appeals ruling that blocked offshore Arctic drilling MORE (I-Maine) on Tuesday said the Senate Intelligence Committee’s controversial report on enhanced interrogation will reveal "chilling" information and compared the techniques that were used to war crimes.

“We did things, Alisyn, that we tried Japanese soldiers for war crimes for after World War II,” he told the host of CNN’s “New Day,” Alisyn Camerota.

“This is not America, this is not who we are, and what was done has diminished our stature and inflamed terrorists around the world.”

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The Tuesday release of the report from Senate Democrats, which looks at the use of “enhanced interrogation” during the George W. Bush administration, has been the subject of sharp debate with lawmakers, administration officials and the intelligence community.

Secretary of State John KerryJohn Forbes KerryOcasio-Cortez and Cruz's dialogue shows common ground isn't just for moderates 'Landslide' for Biden? A look at 40 years of inaccurate presidential polls Trump campaign considering making a play for blue state Oregon: report MORE, as well as current and former intelligence officers, have warned that the release could provoke terrorists into an attack on Americans as retribution. Embassies and military facilities around the world have tightened security.

Supporters of releasing the report, like King, argue it is a necessary step toward admitting wrongs and renouncing torture.  

“It’s important to take this step to say who we are and that we are not going to be doing this again,” King said.

Proponents of the harsh interrogation practices say intelligence officers need leeway when questioning some of the world’s most dangerous people and that those methods could help to pry loose actionable intelligence.

King rejected that argument and said the “heart of the report” shows that the methods didn’t produce solid leads.

“Did we torture people? Yes,” he said. “Did it work? No.”