President Obama told reporters Friday he was "glad" the House passed a $1.1 trillion funding package the evening before, and he remained "hopeful" the Senate would adopt the spending measure.

The president, who lobbied hard in favor of the legislation ahead of the dramatic late-night vote, said the bill "allows us to build on the economic progress and the national security progress that's important" ahead of a meeting of top administration officials coordinating the federal response to the Ebola crisis.

ADVERTISEMENT

He acknowledged "there are a couple provisions in this bill that I really do not like," but said that ultimately, "this is what is produced when you have a divided government that the American people voted for."

"Had I been able to draft my own legislation, get it passed without any Republican votes, I suspect it would be slightly different," Obama said. "That is not the circumstance we find ourselves in, and I think what the American people very much are looking for is responsible governance and the willingness to compromise, and that's what we've clearly done."

Obama did take time to praise provisions of the spending bill that protected the implementation of his signature healthcare plan, funded early childhood education programs and underwrote the creation of public-private manufacturing hubs.

Obama also said he was pleased with funding to fight climate change.

But two controversial provisions — one rolling back aspects of the Dodd-Frank financial reform bill and the other reducing limits on campaign contributions — have drawn the ire of progressive Democrats like Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenDem lawmaker says Electoral College was 'conceived' as way to perpetuate slavery GOP rep to introduce constitutional amendment to limit Supreme Court seats to 9 Warren introduces petition to end the Electoral College MORE (D-Mass.) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.).

Pelosi said she was "enormously disappointed" the White House was accepting the deal and "heartbroken" by aspects of the legislation.

Earlier Friday, White House spokesman Josh Earnest dismissed concerns about whether the split could strain the relationship between Obama and Pelosi.

"The president has always had not just a good working relationship but an open line of communication with Leader Pelosi, and that didn’t change yesterday and it’s not going to change in the future," he said.