Rubio misses 99 votes
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Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioTrump moves forward with F-16 sale to Taiwan opposed by China The Hill's Morning Report — Trump and the new Israel-'squad' controversy Trump crosses new line with Omar, Tlaib, Israel move MORE (R-Fla.) has missed a greater percentage of votes over the course of his career than anyone else in the upper chamber, according to an analysis posted Tuesday by the news site Vocativ and GovTrack.us.

They found that the possible 2016 presidential candidate's absentee rate was 8.3 percent, since he missed 99 of his 1,198 opportunities to vote. He was closely followed by Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranSenators introduce bill aimed at protecting Olympic athletes in response to abuse scandals Overnight Defense: Senate fails to override Trump veto on Saudi arms sales | Two US troops killed in Afghanistan | Senators tee up nominations, budget deal ahead of recess Senate fails to override Trump veto on Saudi arms sale MORE (R-Kan.), who missed 8.01 percent of votes, and Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii), who missed 6.83 percent.
 
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Rubio is joined on the list by another possible 2016 contender, Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTrump moves forward with F-16 sale to Taiwan opposed by China The Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape O'Rourke says he will not 'in any scenario' run for Senate MORE (R-Texas). Cruz has missed 6.32 percent of the 712 votes that have taken place during his short tenure.
 

In the House, Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) had the highest absence rate. He has missed 16.34 percent of the 27,195 opportunities he has had to vote over the course of his career, according to the analysis. The average absentee rate in the house was 2.8 percent.

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashLawmakers blast Trump as Israel bars door to Tlaib and Omar House Democrats targeting six more Trump districts for 2020 Sanford headed to New Hampshire amid talk of challenge to Trump MORE (R-Mich.) and Rep. Steve WomackStephen (Steve) Allen WomackLawmakers pay tribute to late Justice Stevens Rubio asks White House to delay B Pentagon contract over Amazon concerns   New CBO report fuels fight over minimum wage MORE (R-Ark.) both have perfect attendance rates.
 
Republicans were more likely to have missed votes in the Senate, the analysis found, and Democrats were more likely to have missed votes in the House. It's not entirely surprising that members of the minority party would miss more votes than lawmakers from the majority, since they have less of an incentive to pass bills.