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Santorum: Obama foreign policy a ‘disaster for America’

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Former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Pa.) condemned President Obama’s foreign policy as a “disaster for America” in his address to the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) on Friday.

“Thanks to the Obama-Clinton foreign policy team, we have gone from a policy of peace through strength to a policy of lead from behind, and it has been a disaster for America” and the world, Santorum said. 

{mosads}”Commander in chief is not an entry-level position, and the Oval Office is not a place for on-the-job training, not in times like this,” he added.

Santorum, the 2012 Republican presidential runner-up, has been weighing another bid for the White House and used the speech to burnish his foreign policy and economic credentials.

He charged Obama with refusing to properly identify the threat from radical Islam.

“Offering marked refusal to embrace the reality of evil is nothing new,” said Santorum.

He also highlighted his support for Israel, saying Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu would not be addressing Congress next week if the nuclear threat from Iran was not “existential.”

“This is a dangerous time, but here’s the good news — elections matter,” Santorum said, harkening back to Ronald Reagan’s 1980 victory.

Santorum also criticized the Obama administration for saying that climate change is a bigger threat than terrorism. 

“We don’t need a weatherman in chief, we need a commander in chief to run this country,” he said, calling for a tougher response against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS).

“We need to start by crushing ISIS now,” he added, calling for 10,000 U.S. combat troops. 

Santorum touted his 2012 performance, noting his trio of early victories and promising to be the “pro-freedom, pro-family, pro-growth and pro-worker” candidate, if he were to run in 2016.

“I won because I stood for someone — the little guy, the American worker,” Santorum said. “If we’re going to win in 2016, we need to stand for the little guy, too.”

He argued that the U.S. should restore its manufacturing base, improve infrastructure, increase energy development and focus on social issues like education, noting that 70 percent of Americans don’t have a college education, and emphasizing vocational training.

He also took a shot at a top likely GOP presidential rival, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, declaring, “Back in 2012, I wasn’t for Common Core, and today, I’m still not for Common Core.”

Bush’s support for the educational standards has been a target for conservatives.

Santorum ended his 2012 bid after a trio of primary losses and the hospitalization of his daughter Bella, who was born with a rare genetic condition. 

Recently he has said his family felt in a better position should he launch another presidential bid and has been promoting a book about his daughter Bella.

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