Muslim group distributing Quran over Carson flap

One of the nation’s largest advocacy groups for Muslims is handing out Islam’s sacred text following GOP presidential candidate Ben Carson’s controversial remarks on the faith.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) announced on Monday that it is distributing Islam’s holiest scripture in a “Share the Quran” campaign meant to educate Americans about the religion.

“CAIR’s research shows a direct correlation between increasing knowledge of Islam and decreasing anti-Muslim prejudice,” said CAIR Executive Director Nihad Awad during a press conference revealing the initiative in Washington, D.C.

ADVERTISEMENT

The group previously distributed 130,000 Qurans, and is now reviving the program. Those able to visit CAIR’s headquarters in Washington, D.C., can pick up a free copy, while it is charging $9.95 in shipping and handling for those interested in obtaining the religious work from outside the nation’s capital.

The Qurans contain the original Arabic of the scripture alongside an English translation and notes on individual verses.

The group said the effort is meant to clear up misconceptions Americans may have of the Muslim faith.

Carson made national headlines on Sunday by declaring that practicing Islam should disqualify political candidates from becoming president.

“I would not advocate that we put a Muslim in charge of this nation,” Carson said on NBC’s “Meet the Press” that morning. “I absolutely would not agree with that.”

Carson then reiterated his stance on the issue during an exclusive follow-up interview with The Hill later that evening.

“I do not believe that Sharia is consistent with the Constitution of this country,” the retired neurosurgeon said, citing certain interpretations of Muslim law.

CAIR is additionally urging Carson to abandon his quest for the Oval Office next year following the former doctor’s remarks.

Carson presently ranks second out of 16 Republican White House hopefuls with 18.8 percent, according to the latest RealClearPolitics average of national polls.