Obama: I won't negotiate on debt limit
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President Obama is pressing lawmakers to raise the federal debt ceiling and says he won't be drawn into negotiations.

"When it comes to the debt ceiling, we're not going back there," Obama said during a press conference in the State Dining Room of the White House on Friday.

His comments come after Treasury Secretary Jack LewJacob (Jack) Joseph LewThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden argues for legislative patience, urgent action amid crisis On The Money: Senate confirms Yellen as first female Treasury secretary | Biden says he's open to tighter income limits for stimulus checks | Administration will look to expedite getting Tubman on bill Sorry Mr. Jackson, Tubman on the is real MORE set a Nov. 5 deadline on Thursday for raising the debt limit to avert a potential default on current loans. That gives Congress just a few weeks to hammer out an agreement on the current $18.1 trillion limit.

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Obama acknowledged that Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerRift widens between business groups and House GOP Juan Williams: Pelosi shows her power Debt ceiling games endanger US fiscal credibility — again MORE's (R-Ohio) plans to leave Congress in October will complicate budget negotiations with congressional leaders, but said he believed there is a path to an agreement.

"I do think there is still a path for us to come up with a reasonable agreement that raises the spending caps above sequester to make sure that we can properly finance both our defense and non-defense needs, that maintains a prudent control of our deficits and that we can do that in short order," Obama said.

"It's not that complicated. The math is the math," he added, saying he has spoken with BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerRift widens between business groups and House GOP Juan Williams: Pelosi shows her power Debt ceiling games endanger US fiscal credibility — again MORE, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHoyer signals House vote on bill to 'remove' debt limit threat Biden signs bill to raise debt ceiling On The Money — Progressives play hard ball on Biden budget plan MORE (R-Ky.), Senate Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidDemocrats brace for tough election year in Nevada The Memo: Biden's horizon is clouded by doubt Fight over Biden agenda looms large over Virginia governor's race MORE (D-Nev.) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.).

Congress on Wednesday passed a short-term bill to keep the government funded through Dec. 11.

Obama said Friday that "extraneous issues" should be kept out of budget talks, mentioning the current fight over funding Planned Parenthood.

"You can't have an issue like that potentially wreck the entire U.S. economy, any more than I should hold the entire budget hostage to my desire to do something about gun violence," Obama said during the press conference, where he talked about gun control in the aftermath of Thursday's mass shooting at an Oregon college.

"There are some fights that we fight individually," Obama said.