Ex-RNC chief suggests he'd back Biden over Trump
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A former Republican National Committee chairman suggests in a new article he would consider voting for Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump renews culture war, putting GOP on edge Atlanta mayor says she has tested positive for COVID-19 Trump downplaying sparks new criticism of COVID-19 response MORE over GOP front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpCNN's Anderson Cooper: Trump's Bubba Wallace tweet was 'racist, just plain and simple' Beats by Dre announces deal with Bubba Wallace, defends him after Trump remarks Overnight Defense: DOD reportedly eyeing Confederate flag ban | House military spending bill blocks wall funding MORE in a theoretical general election matchup.

“I would not vote for Trump, clearly," Mel Martinez, who also served as a senator from Florida, told The Wall Street Journal for a story published Monday night.

“If there is any, any, any other choice, a living, breathing person with a pulse, I would be there," Martinez added.

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The newspaper said Martinez ruled out voting for Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillicon Valley: QAnon scores wins, creating GOP problem | Supreme Court upholds regulation banning robocalls to cellphones | Foreign hackers take aim at homebound Americans | Uber acquires Postmates The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump's job approval erodes among groups that powered his 2016 victory Gallup: Trump's job approval rating erodes among key groups MORE, the Democratic front-runner, but could have backed Biden over Trump if the vice president were in the presidential race.

Martinez, who on Monday announced his backing of Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump wants schools to reopen, challenged on 'harmless' COVID-19 remark Russian bounties revive Trump-GOP foreign policy divide Congress eyes tighter restrictions on next round of small business help MORE in the GOP race after Jeb Bush dropped out in February, told the Journal that Trump's path to the nomination is "kind of cooked."

Some Republicans have begun to weigh the possibility of supporting an alternate candidate if Trump, who is riding high heading into Super Tuesday, secures the GOP nomination.

Ben Sasse of Nebraska became the first GOP senator this week to publicly declare he would not support Trump if he were the nominee, telling other Republicans, "We can do better."

Trump is looking to fend off Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGianforte halts in-person campaigning after wife, running mate attend event with Guilfoyle Trump administration grants funding extension for Texas testing sites Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill banning federal government use of facial recognition tech | House lawmakers roll out legislation to establish national cyber director | Top federal IT official to step down MORE and Marco Rubio on Tuesday, when a dozen states hold voting in the GOP race after Trump picked up three consecutive wins in February.