Trump would move US Embassy to Jerusalem
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Donald Trump says he would move the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

That stance puts him in line with the Republican Party's conservative base but would break two decades of bipartisan White House policy. 

The GOP front-runner's addressed the issue Monday afternoon on CNN's "The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer."

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When Blitzer, who started his journalism career in Israel, asked Trump if he'd move the embassy as president, the candidate said, "Yes, I would."

Trump shied away from providing a specific timeline for the action, referencing his upcoming Monday evening speech at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) annual conference.

Trump had previously balked at publicly declaring whether he'd back moving the U.S. Embassy when he spoke at a Republican Jewish Coalition event last year. 

The debate over recognizing Jerusalem has been a thorny issue in U.S.-Israel relations for decades. Both Israel and the Palestinians claim it as their capital city.

The U.S. still views it as an international city, in line with the United Nations, and says its status should be determined by negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians.

For years, there has been bipartisan support for legislation to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital and move the American embassy there from Tel Aviv.

But Presidents Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonChanging the climate of presidential debates Davis: My advice to Joe Biden on eve of the debate — be Joe Biden Is Congress reasserting itself? MORE, George W. Bush, and Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaJudge orders Georgia officials to provide backup paper poll books ahead of election Supreme Court fight should drive Democrats and help Biden Michelle Obama says even former first families can get on each other's nerves during quarantine MORE have all asserted executive power to avoid carrying out that policy, arguing that remaining neutral on Jerusalem is imperative to America's national security interests.

GOP rivals Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSupreme Court fight should drive Democrats and help Biden Fears grow of chaotic election Senate GOP set to vote on Trump's Supreme Court pick before election MORE and John Kasich both side with Israel on the Jerusalem issue. Both Democratic candidates, Bernie SandersBernie SandersPresident Trump faces Herculean task in first debate The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by JobsOhio - Trump's tax return bombshell New Biden campaign ad jabs at Trump's reported 0 income tax payments MORE and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonOvernight Defense: Government funding bill butts up against deadline | Pentagon reports eighth military COVID-19 death | Trump, Pentagon collide over anti-diversity training push Voters split on whether Trump, Biden will win first debate: poll New Monmouth poll finds Biden with 6-point lead MORE, have not addressed it on the campaign trail.

In 2012, GOP nominee Mitt Romney called Jerusalem the capital of Israel and said he would move the embassy there if elected.

Updated at 5:41 p.m.