Trump would move US Embassy to Jerusalem
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Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpConway defends herself against Hatch Act allegations amid threat of subpoena How to defuse Gulf tensions and avoid war with Iran Trump says 'stubborn child' Fed 'blew it' by not cutting rates MORE says he would move the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

That stance puts him in line with the Republican Party's conservative base but would break two decades of bipartisan White House policy. 

The GOP front-runner's addressed the issue Monday afternoon on CNN's "The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer."

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When Blitzer, who started his journalism career in Israel, asked Trump if he'd move the embassy as president, the candidate said, "Yes, I would."

Trump shied away from providing a specific timeline for the action, referencing his upcoming Monday evening speech at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) annual conference.

Trump had previously balked at publicly declaring whether he'd back moving the U.S. Embassy when he spoke at a Republican Jewish Coalition event last year. 

The debate over recognizing Jerusalem has been a thorny issue in U.S.-Israel relations for decades. Both Israel and the Palestinians claim it as their capital city.

The U.S. still views it as an international city, in line with the United Nations, and says its status should be determined by negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians.

For years, there has been bipartisan support for legislation to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital and move the American embassy there from Tel Aviv.

But Presidents Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonBiden, Eastland and rejecting the cult of civility Democrats not keen to reignite Jerusalem embassy fight The bottom dollar on recession, Trump's base, and his reelection prospects MORE, George W. Bush, and Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaBiden, Eastland and rejecting the cult of civility Biden lays out immigration priorities, rips Trump for 'assault on dignity' Democrats not keen to reignite Jerusalem embassy fight MORE have all asserted executive power to avoid carrying out that policy, arguing that remaining neutral on Jerusalem is imperative to America's national security interests.

GOP rivals Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward Cruz Hickenlooper, Bennet bring deep ties to 2020 debate stage 2020 Democrat Bennet releases comprehensive government reform plan GOP frets about Trump's poll numbers MORE and John Kasich both side with Israel on the Jerusalem issue. Both Democratic candidates, Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill's Morning Report - Crunch time arrives for 2020 Dems with debates on deck The Memo: All eyes on faltering Biden ahead of first debate Progressive group launches campaign to identify voters who switch to Warren MORE and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe Hill's Morning Report - Crunch time arrives for 2020 Dems with debates on deck The Memo: All eyes on faltering Biden ahead of first debate Trump says he's not prepared to lose in 2020 MORE, have not addressed it on the campaign trail.

In 2012, GOP nominee Mitt Romney called Jerusalem the capital of Israel and said he would move the embassy there if elected.

Updated at 5:41 p.m.