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Abortion rights activists plan protests outside of Supreme Court justices’ homes

Protesters are seen outside the Supreme Court on Tuesday, May 3, 2022 after the leak of a draft majority opinion written by Justice Samuel Alito preparing for the court to overturn Roe v. Wade later this year.
Greg Nash
Protesters are seen outside the Supreme Court on Tuesday, May 3, 2022 after the leak of a draft majority opinion written by Justice Samuel Alito preparing for the court to overturn Roe v. Wade later this year.

Abortion rights activists are planning to protest outside of the homes of the conservative justices on the Supreme Court after a leaked draft of a majority opinion overturning Roe v. Wade was published earlier this week.

Ruth Sent Us, a progressive activist organization, posted on their website that they will be protesting outside the homes of the six conservative justices on May 11. 

“At the homes of the six extremist justices, three in Virginia and three in Maryland. If you’d like to join or lead a peaceful protest, let us know,” the site reads. 

The planned protests come after Politico published the leaked draft written by staunch conservative Justice Samuel Alito that states the court would overturn Roe v. Wade, effectively ending federal protections for abortions. The opinion would move the decision on abortion down to the states.

Following the report, the Supreme Court said that the draft, which was penned in February, was authentic, but that a final decision has not yet been made on the matter.

Another group, Shutdown DC, announced a vigil at Alito’s house on Monday, May 9.

“Justice Alito thinks he can take away our rights. But our rights are fundamentally ours. We’re showing up to tell him in person,” the tweet read.

The tweet included a graphic with the location of the justice’s house.

When asked about previous protests outside of the justices’ homes on Thursday, White House press secretary Jen Psaki dodged the question.  

“I think our view here is that peaceful protests — there’s a long history in the United States, in the country of that. And we’ve certainly encouraged people to keep it peaceful and not resort to any level of violence,” Psaki said when asked if the president would discourage protesters from going to the justices’ homes. 

The six conservative justices are: Brett Kavanaugh, Clarence Thomas, Amy Coney Barrett, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch and John Roberts. 

When asked if the White House condoned posting justices’ addresses online, Psaki said: “The president’s view is that there’s a lot of passion, a lot of fear, a lot of sadness from many, many people across this country about what they saw in that leaked document,” Psaki said. 

“We obviously want people’s privacy to be respected. We want people to protest peacefully if they want to protest. That is certainly what the president’s view would be.”

The Hill has reached out to the Supreme Court for comment.

Tags abortion abortion protests Jen Psaki Samuel Alito Supreme Court white house

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