Sanders thanks McCain for opposing ObamaCare repeal bill

Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersThe Memo: Tide turns on Kavanaugh Election Countdown: Trump confident about midterms in Hill.TV interview | Kavanaugh controversy tests candidates | Sanders, Warren ponder if both can run | Super PACs spending big | Two states open general election voting Friday | Latest Senate polls READ: President Trump’s exclusive interview with Hill.TV MORE (I-Vt.) thanked Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump administration weakens methane pollution standards for drilling on public lands Another recession could hit US in 2019, says credit union association chief R-E-S-P-E-C-T: One legacy of Franklin and McCain is up to us MORE (R-Ariz.) on Friday for opposing the new GOP bill to repeal ObamaCare. McCain's vote was vital in the Republican effort to pass the bill.

"Thank you, John. You have the conscience that I wish very much the rest of the Republican leadership had as well," Sanders tweeted on Friday.

McCain cited his conscience in his Friday announcement he would not vote for the Republican legislation.

The GOP needs almost every Republican vote in the Senate to pass an ObamaCare repeal bill sponsored by Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin Graham GOP senator: Kavanaugh accuser 'moving the goalposts' Collins: Kavanaugh accuser should 'reconsider,' testify on Monday Grassley willing to send staff to California to speak with Kavanaugh accuser MORE (R-S.C.) and Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyOvernight Health Care: Senators target surprise medical bills | Group looks to allow Medicaid funds for substance abuse programs | FDA launches anti-vaping campaign for teens Bipartisan senators unveil proposal to crack down on surprise medical bills Outdated global postal system hurts US manufacturers MORE (R-La.). McCain's defection, along with Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulConservatives left frustrated as Congress passes big spending bills Senate approves 4B spending bill Some employees' personal data revealed in State Department email breach: report MORE's (R-Ky.) which was previously announced, means the bill might not have the support to pass.

“I cannot in good conscience vote for the Graham-Cassidy proposal. I believe we could do better working together, Republicans and Democrats, and have not yet really tried," McCain said in a Friday statement.

Sanders, an independent socialist, introduced a "Medicare for All" bill supported by many Democrats that would institute a single-payer healthcare system.

The senator is expected to debate alongside Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharElection Countdown: Trump confident about midterms in Hill.TV interview | Kavanaugh controversy tests candidates | Sanders, Warren ponder if both can run | Super PACs spending big | Two states open general election voting Friday | Latest Senate polls GOP in striking distance to retake Franken seat Warner: 'overwhelming majority' of Republicans would back social media regulations MORE (D-Minn.) against Graham and Cassidy in a CNN townhall-style discussion on Monday night.