Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanHillicon Valley: Biden, Putin agree to begin work on addressing cybersecurity concerns | Senate panel unanimously advances key Biden cyber nominees | Rick Scott threatens to delay national security nominees until Biden visits border Trump, allies pressured DOJ to back election claims, documents show The tale of the last bipartisan unicorns MORE (R-Ohio), a key conservative and House Freedom Caucus member, said Thursday that special counsel Robert Mueller is in a "precarious position" over the Uranium One deal, given his lack of action on the issue.  

"Robert Mueller, I think, in light of what we've also recently learned, relative to the Uranium One Deal, surely seems a bit compromised to me," Jordan said in a Fox News interview, adding that his failure to press charges in the investigation of the sale to Russia of a U.S. uranium company puts him in "a somewhat precarious position." 

The congressman said that the "best thing to do" would be for Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsThe Hill's Morning Report - After high-stakes Biden-Putin summit, what now? Border state governors rebel against Biden's immigration chaos Garland strikes down Trump-era asylum decisions MORE to name another special counsel to look into the case. 

Jordan, vice chairman of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, joined a group of Republicans this week who took the House floor calling for Mueller's recusal from his ongoing probe into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election.

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Mueller, the congressmen say, is impartial to the Russia investigation because of his inaction on the 2010 sale of a uranium company with holdings in the U.S. to the Russian nuclear giant Rosatom.

The House Intelliegence and Oversight committees formally launched investigations of the deal last month, retreading familiar ground for Republicans, who have used the issue of the sale to try to discredit former Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonVirginia governor's race poses crucial test for GOP Hillary Clinton backs Shontel Brown in Ohio congressional race Hillary Clinton: Casting doubt on 2020 election is 'doing Putin's work' MORE since it was revealed in conservative author Peter Schweitzer's 2015 book "Clinton Cash."

The approval for the takeover was inked by a nine-agency review board that included the State Department when Clinton was secretary of State.

Republicans say their concerns were stonewalled by the Obama administration at the time and now they want to know whether the deal should have been approved in the first place.