Fox News host Tucker Carlson on Tuesday night criticized President TrumpDonald John TrumpMarine unit in Florida reportedly pushing to hold annual ball at Trump property Giuliani clashes with CNN's Cuomo, calls him a 'sellout' and the 'enemy' Giuliani says 'of course' he asked Ukraine to look into Biden seconds after denying it MORE for deferring to lawmakers on immigration policy during a televised negotiation session early in the day.

“Today, in a remarkable twist, the president held a televised meeting with the very swamp creatures he once denounced. He told them he trusted them to craft immigration policy without his input. Then he suggested he’d be willing to accept any deal they produced, even a bad one,” Carlson said on his eponymous Fox News show.

“These are the same people the president now says he trusts to write the immigration bill, the one he says he’ll sign no matter what it says. So what was the point of running for president?” Carlson added. 

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Trump presided over a negotiation session with lawmakers from both parties on Tuesday to discuss immigration issues such as border security and the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Trump indicated he would support what those in the room came up with, adding that he was willing to “take the heat” to back a bipartisan deal. 

Trump at one point said he wants a “bill of love” to address DACA, an Obama-era measure that allowed certain immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children to live and work here without fear of deportation.

The Trump administration announced last year it was ending DACA, giving Congress until March 5 to come up with a solution for its beneficiaries.

Carlson on Tuesday noted that Trump’s position seemed to align with that of his fellow 2016 Republican presidential candidate, Jeb Bush.

If Trump maintains his position on negotiations, Carlson added, it provides Democrats with significant leverage to get what they want on immigration issues.

"Being a Trump voter isn’t always easy. It’s like rooting for the underdog in baseball, the old Chicago Cubs," Carlson said. "On one level, there is pride, the pride that comes from doing something that fashionable people consider insane, and that’s a good feeling. But there’s also some disappointment along the way, and honestly there’s some embarrassment.”