Trump nominates wife of ex-Louisiana senator to be federal judge
© Greg Nash

President TrumpDonald John TrumpJoaquín Castro: Trump would be 'in court right now' if he weren't the president or 'privileged' Trump flubs speech location at criminal justice conference Comey reveals new details on Russia probe during House testimony MORE on Tuesday nominated the wife of former Sen. David VitterDavid Bruce VitterLouisiana congressman to challenge Dem Gov Kennedy says he won't run for Louisiana governor next year Dems face tough road ahead in Deep South MORE (R-La.) to serve as a federal judge. 

The White House announced Trump's nomination of Wendy Vitter as U.S. district court judge for the Eastern District of Louisiana along with three other nominees for federal courts in Texas for confirmation by the Senate.

Vitter previously served as the general counsel for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans and managed her husband's House campaigns and assisted with his Senate bids.

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Both Louisiana Sens. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyGOP balks at Trump drug pricing plan Overnight Defense: Senate rebukes Trump with Yemen vote | Mattis, Pompeo briefing fails to quell Senate concerns with Saudis | Graham demands CIA briefing on Khashoggi | Pentagon identifies three troops killed in Afghanistan Congress: Improve Medicare home health reforms to protect patient care MORE (R) and John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R) praised Vitter's nomination to be a federal judge on Tuesday.

Kennedy, who replaced Vitter's husband in the Senate, commended her "very important work as a prosecutor and as legal counsel" for the archdiocese.

Vitter was in the public spotlight in 2007 after her husband apologized for a "serious sin" after his number was linked to the "D.C. Madam" escort service.

"Like all marriages, ours is not perfect. None of us are. But we choose to work together as a family," she said at the time during a press conference with her husband.

David Vitter announced he would not seek reelection for the Louisiana seat after losing the state's gubernatorial runoff election in 2015. He works for a Washington, D.C.-based lobbying firm.