Trump nominates wife of ex-Louisiana senator to be federal judge
© Greg Nash

President TrumpDonald John TrumpFive takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's debate showdown Arpaio files libel suit against New York Times IMF's Christine Lagarde delays trip to Middle East MORE on Tuesday nominated the wife of former Sen. David VitterDavid Bruce VitterSenate panel advances Trump nominee who wouldn't say if Brown v. Board of Education was decided correctly Planned Parenthood targets judicial nominee over abortion comments Trump nominates wife of ex-Louisiana senator to be federal judge MORE (R-La.) to serve as a federal judge. 

The White House announced Trump's nomination of Wendy Vitter as U.S. district court judge for the Eastern District of Louisiana along with three other nominees for federal courts in Texas for confirmation by the Senate.

Vitter previously served as the general counsel for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans and managed her husband's House campaigns and assisted with his Senate bids.

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Both Louisiana Sens. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyTrump signs bills banning drug pricing 'gag clauses' Dem ad accuses Heller of 'lying' about record on pre-existing conditions GOP senator suggests criminal referral for third Kavanaugh accuser's 'apparently false affidavit' MORE (R) and John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R) praised Vitter's nomination to be a federal judge on Tuesday.

Kennedy, who replaced Vitter's husband in the Senate, commended her "very important work as a prosecutor and as legal counsel" for the archdiocese.

Vitter was in the public spotlight in 2007 after her husband apologized for a "serious sin" after his number was linked to the "D.C. Madam" escort service.

"Like all marriages, ours is not perfect. None of us are. But we choose to work together as a family," she said at the time during a press conference with her husband.

David Vitter announced he would not seek reelection for the Louisiana seat after losing the state's gubernatorial runoff election in 2015. He works for a Washington, D.C.-based lobbying firm.