Feinstein: 'Congress won't stand for' Trump firing Mueller
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Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinHillicon Valley: Senators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency plan | Trump vows to 'take a look' at Google's ties to China | Google denies working with China's military | Tech execs on defensive at antitrust hearing | Bill would bar business with Huawei Epstein charges show Congress must act to protect children from abuse Feinstein introduces bill to prohibit campaigns from using social media bots MORE (D-Calif.) said Friday that Congress "won't stand for"  President TrumpDonald John TrumpPompeo changes staff for Russia meeting after concerns raised about top negotiator's ties: report House unravels with rise of 'Les Enfants Terrible' Ben Carson: Trump is not a racist and his comments were not racist MORE firing special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTop Republican considered Mueller subpoena to box in Democrats Kamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump MORE following reports that Trump tried to have Mueller fired last summer. 

“It’s very unfortunate that this president doesn’t respect the law or the Constitution, and if he fires Bob Mueller, I expect Congress won’t stand for it and will take action," Feinstein said in a statement. 

Trump reportedly backed down from firing Mueller when White House counsel Don McGahn threatened to resign over the matter, refusing to give Trump's demand to the Justice Department. 

McGahn feared Trump firing the special counsel would raise concerns that Trump had obstructed justice during the investigation of possible collusion between Russia and Trump's campaign.

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Feinstein, a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee that is holding a parallel probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 election, said that "nothing has changed" since she last noted that Trump did not have the authority to fire the special counsel.

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerSenators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency at hearing Lawmakers introduce bill to block U.S. companies from doing business with Huawei Trump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand MORE (Va.), the top Democrat on the committee, also said that firing Mueller would be a "red line that the president cannot cross," calling any interference by Trump in the investigation a "gross abuse of power."

The New York Times report confirmed rumors that Trump, who has consistently denied any collusion between his campaign and the Russians and pushed for an end to Mueller's probe, wanted him removed.

But Trump denied the story Friday, calling it "fake news," calling the report "typical New York Times."

Sources confirmed The New York Times report to a number of other news outlets.