Former President George W. Bush on Thursday said that there is “clear evidence” of Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

Bush made the comments while speaking at a summit in Abu Dhabi, according to The Associated Press, at a time when tensions are rising between President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump passes Pence a dangerous buck Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Trump nods at reputation as germaphobe during coronavirus briefing: 'I try to bail out as much as possible' after sneezes MORE and U.S. intelligence agencies over the investigation into Russian meddling.

“There’s pretty clear evidence that the Russians meddled,” Bush said, the news service reported. “Whether they affected the outcome is another question.”

“It’s problematic that a foreign nation is involved in our election system,” he added. “Our democracy is only as good as people trust the results.”

U.S. intelligence agencies concluded last year that Russia interfered in the election, and evidence that Russian operatives used social media platforms to influence voter opinions continues to build.

ADVERTISEMENT

Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonTrump lashes out over Kelly criticism: 'He misses the action' Timeline: Trump and Romney's rocky relationship Top Democrat demands Barr recuse himself from case against Turkish bank MORE said Wednesday that Russia is already attempting to interfere in the 2018 midterm elections.

There are several ongoing investigations into whether the Trump campaign colluded with Russia to win the election, probes which Trump has repeatedly referred to as witch hunts.

The Trump administration earlier this month declined to impose new sanctions on Russia over the meddling, saying that the threat of increased sanctions is already “serving as a deterrent” to the Kremlin.

In his latest remarks, Bush also criticized Russian President Vladimir Putin, saying that he has a “chip on his shoulder.”

“The reason he does is because of the demise of the Soviet Union troubles him,” Bush said, according to the AP. “Therefore, much of his moves [are] to regain Soviet hegemony.”