Poll: Majority disapproves of Trump's military parade plan
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A majority of American voters opposes President TrumpDonald John TrumpOver 100 lawmakers consistently voted against chemical safeguards: study CNN's Anderson Cooper unloads on Trump Jr. for spreading 'idiotic' conspiracy theories about him Cohn: Jamie Dimon would be 'phenomenal' president MORE’s request for a military parade, with many saying it’s not a good use of taxpayer dollars, according to a poll released Tuesday.

The Quinnipiac University poll found 61 percent of voters disapprove of the military parade, which is now in the planning stages, compared to 26 percent who support the idea.

Meanwhile, three-quarters of voters believe the parade is not a good use of government funds, pollsters found. 

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While the parade itself has support among 58 percent of Republicans, 52 percent of GOP voters say the event is not a good use of government funds, according to the poll.

The White House and Pentagon earlier this month confirmed a Washington Post report that Trump has requested officials look into scheduling a military parade. Details of such an event, including a date and time, are still being discussed.

The concept was met with opposition from Democrats and some Republicans, who said it would mirror events held in authoritarian countries and would be a waste of money. Some Pentagon officials are also reportedly concerned about the logistics of the event.

Some Republicans have said they’d support a parade that focused on the men and women in the armed forces, rather than a display of military might.

White House budget director Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyFinancial policymakers must be suffering from amnesia On The Money: Broad coalition unites against Trump tariffs | Senate confirms new IRS chief | Median household income rose for third straight year in 2017 | Jamie Dimon's brief battle with Trump Eight weeks out: Dems see narrow path to Senate majority MORE told lawmakers last week that the event could cost between $10 million and $30 million.

The Quinnipiac poll was conducted from Feb. 16-19 and surveyed 1,249 voters. Its margin of error is plus or minus 3.4 percentage points.