Romney backs Laura Bush on border: 'We need a more compassionate answer'
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Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyIraq War looms over Trump battle with Iran Alabama state senator introduces bill to repeal state's abortion ban Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — McConnell, Kaine offer bill to raise tobacco buying age to 21 | Measles outbreak spreads to 24 states | Pro-ObamaCare group launches ad blitz to protect Dems MORE on Monday came out against President TrumpDonald John TrumpFeinstein, Iranian foreign minister had dinner amid tensions: report The Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Harris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign MORE’s policy of separating migrant families at the southern border, saying that the U.S. needs a “more compassionate answer” to illegal crossings.

The former Massachusetts governor and current Utah GOP Senate candidate retweeted former first lady Laura Bush, who wrote an op-ed criticizing the policy as “cruel” and “immoral.”

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Romney is one of a growing number of GOP figures to speak out against the policy. Republican Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Collins offering bill to boost battery research as GOP pushes energy 'innovation' Biden says Congress must move to protect abortion rights MORE (Maine) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeOil companies join blitz for carbon tax The Hill's Morning Report - White House, Congress: Urgency of now around budget Jeff Daniels blasts 'cowardice' of Senate Republicans against Trump MORE (Ariz.) wrote a letter to Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenCongressional Hispanic Caucus demands answers on death of migrant children Trump expected to tap Cuccinelli for new immigration post Kobach gave list of demands to White House for 'immigration czar' job: report MORE seeking clarification on the policy. 

Collins said Sunday that she does not support the policy, which she called “inconsistent with our American values.” 

All 49 members of the Senate Democratic caucus have pledged support for legislation to prevent the separation of families at the border. No Republican senators have yet said they would support the bill.

The Trump administration earlier this year announced a “zero tolerance” policy to prosecute adults crossing the border illegally, leading to thousands of migrant children being separated from their parents.

In recent days, images and accounts from undocumented youth detention centers have emerged, sparking major outcry from primarily Democratic lawmakers. 

Trump has incorrectly and repeatedly claimed that the policy is the “law” and has blamed Democrats for not acting on immigration legislation.

But Trump administration officials, including Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsJeffrey Rosen officially sworn in as deputy attorney general House Democrats leave empty chair for McGahn at hearing MSNBC host: Barr 'the most dangerous person' who works for Trump MORE and chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE, have defended the policy as a necessary border security measure. And Nielsen insisted Sunday that the administration does not “have a policy” to separate families. 

Trump is scheduled to meet with House Republicans about immigration on Tuesday.