Romney backs Laura Bush on border: 'We need a more compassionate answer'
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Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyWar of words at the White House GOP warns Graham letter to Pelosi on impeachment could 'backfire' Club for Growth to run ads in Utah attacking Romney as 'Democrat secret asset' MORE on Monday came out against President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP congressman slams Trump over report that U.S. bombed former anti-ISIS coalition headquarters US to restore 'targeted assistance' to Central American countries after migration deal Trump says lawmakers should censure Schiff MORE’s policy of separating migrant families at the southern border, saying that the U.S. needs a “more compassionate answer” to illegal crossings.

The former Massachusetts governor and current Utah GOP Senate candidate retweeted former first lady Laura Bush, who wrote an op-ed criticizing the policy as “cruel” and “immoral.”

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Romney is one of a growing number of GOP figures to speak out against the policy. Republican Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGOP warns Graham letter to Pelosi on impeachment could 'backfire' The Hill's Morning Report - Dem debate contenders take aim at Warren Schumer seeks focus on health care amid impeachment fever MORE (Maine) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeTrump's GOP impeachment firewall holds strong How to survive an impeachment Are Senate Republicans certain that Trump can return to office? MORE (Ariz.) wrote a letter to Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenTrump says acting Homeland Security chief McAleenan will step down Activists to demonstrate at ICE headquarters after Cameroonian immigrant dies in custody Ex-Citizenship and Immigration Services chief returns to DHS in different role MORE seeking clarification on the policy. 

Collins said Sunday that she does not support the policy, which she called “inconsistent with our American values.” 

All 49 members of the Senate Democratic caucus have pledged support for legislation to prevent the separation of families at the border. No Republican senators have yet said they would support the bill.

The Trump administration earlier this year announced a “zero tolerance” policy to prosecute adults crossing the border illegally, leading to thousands of migrant children being separated from their parents.

In recent days, images and accounts from undocumented youth detention centers have emerged, sparking major outcry from primarily Democratic lawmakers. 

Trump has incorrectly and repeatedly claimed that the policy is the “law” and has blamed Democrats for not acting on immigration legislation.

But Trump administration officials, including Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump attacks Sessions: A 'total disaster' and 'an embarrassment to the great state of Alabama' Ocasio-Cortez fires back at Washington Times after story on her 'high-dollar hairdo' Trump's tirades, taunts and threats are damaging our democracy MORE and chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE, have defended the policy as a necessary border security measure. And Nielsen insisted Sunday that the administration does not “have a policy” to separate families. 

Trump is scheduled to meet with House Republicans about immigration on Tuesday.