Romney backs Laura Bush on border: 'We need a more compassionate answer'
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Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneySenate gears up for Green New Deal vote Senate GOP proposes constitutional amendment to keep Supreme Court at 9 seats The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - Mueller report is huge win for President Trump MORE on Monday came out against President TrumpDonald John TrumpPapadopoulos claims he was pressured to sign plea deal Tlaib asking colleagues to support impeachment investigation resolution Trump rips 'Mainstream Media': 'They truly are the Enemy of the People' MORE’s policy of separating migrant families at the southern border, saying that the U.S. needs a “more compassionate answer” to illegal crossings.

The former Massachusetts governor and current Utah GOP Senate candidate retweeted former first lady Laura Bush, who wrote an op-ed criticizing the policy as “cruel” and “immoral.”

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Romney is one of a growing number of GOP figures to speak out against the policy. Republican Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - Dems look for traction following Barr-Mueller findings Senate rejection of Green New Deal won't slow Americans' desire for climate action Senate GOP poised to go 'nuclear' on Trump picks MORE (Maine) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeTrump's attacks on McCain exacerbate tensions with Senate GOP Schumer to introduce bill naming Senate office building after McCain amid Trump uproar Trump keeps tight grip on GOP MORE (Ariz.) wrote a letter to Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenPentagon authorizes B in counter-drug money for Trump's border wall Clinton calls for people to sign petition to help DACA recipient detained by ICE Hillicon Valley: Nunes sues Twitter for 0 million | Trump links tech giants to 'Radical Left Democrats' | Facebook settles suits over ad discrimination | Dems want answers over spread of New Zealand shooting video MORE seeking clarification on the policy. 

Collins said Sunday that she does not support the policy, which she called “inconsistent with our American values.” 

All 49 members of the Senate Democratic caucus have pledged support for legislation to prevent the separation of families at the border. No Republican senators have yet said they would support the bill.

The Trump administration earlier this year announced a “zero tolerance” policy to prosecute adults crossing the border illegally, leading to thousands of migrant children being separated from their parents.

In recent days, images and accounts from undocumented youth detention centers have emerged, sparking major outcry from primarily Democratic lawmakers. 

Trump has incorrectly and repeatedly claimed that the policy is the “law” and has blamed Democrats for not acting on immigration legislation.

But Trump administration officials, including Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsPress: Should the media apologize to Donald Trump? After Mueller, Democrats need to avoid the Javert trap Mueller probe: A timeline from beginning to end MORE and chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE, have defended the policy as a necessary border security measure. And Nielsen insisted Sunday that the administration does not “have a policy” to separate families. 

Trump is scheduled to meet with House Republicans about immigration on Tuesday.