Romney backs Laura Bush on border: 'We need a more compassionate answer'
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Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyGranting cash payments is a conservative principle 7 things to know about the coronavirus stimulus package Scarborough rips Trump for mocking Romney's negative coronavirus test: 'Could have been a death sentence' MORE on Monday came out against President TrumpDonald John TrumpCuomo grilled by brother about running for president: 'No. no' Maxine Waters unleashes over Trump COVID-19 response: 'Stop congratulating yourself! You're a failure' Meadows resigns from Congress, heads to White House MORE’s policy of separating migrant families at the southern border, saying that the U.S. needs a “more compassionate answer” to illegal crossings.

The former Massachusetts governor and current Utah GOP Senate candidate retweeted former first lady Laura Bush, who wrote an op-ed criticizing the policy as “cruel” and “immoral.”

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Romney is one of a growing number of GOP figures to speak out against the policy. Republican Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGOP presses for swift Ratcliffe confirmation to intel post Campaigns pivot toward health awareness as races sidelined by coronavirus Senate eyes quick exit after vote on coronavirus stimulus package MORE (Maine) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeMcSally campaign to suspend TV ads, canvassing amid pandemic Coronavirus isn't the only reason Congress should spend less time in DC Trump Jr. says he inherited 'Tourette's of the thumbs' from his father MORE (Ariz.) wrote a letter to Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenHillicon Valley: Twitter falling short on pledge to verify primary candidates | Barr vows to make surveillance reforms after watchdog report | DHS cyber chief focused on 2020 Sen. Kennedy slams acting DHS secretary for lack of coronavirus answers The 'accidental director' on the front line of the fight for election security MORE seeking clarification on the policy. 

Collins said Sunday that she does not support the policy, which she called “inconsistent with our American values.” 

All 49 members of the Senate Democratic caucus have pledged support for legislation to prevent the separation of families at the border. No Republican senators have yet said they would support the bill.

The Trump administration earlier this year announced a “zero tolerance” policy to prosecute adults crossing the border illegally, leading to thousands of migrant children being separated from their parents.

In recent days, images and accounts from undocumented youth detention centers have emerged, sparking major outcry from primarily Democratic lawmakers. 

Trump has incorrectly and repeatedly claimed that the policy is the “law” and has blamed Democrats for not acting on immigration legislation.

But Trump administration officials, including Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsAlabama postpones March 31 GOP Senate runoff Biden has broken all the 'rules' of presidential primaries The Hill's Campaign Report: Defiant Sanders vows to stay in race MORE and chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE, have defended the policy as a necessary border security measure. And Nielsen insisted Sunday that the administration does not “have a policy” to separate families. 

Trump is scheduled to meet with House Republicans about immigration on Tuesday.