Therapists say they've seen a rise in anxiety under Trump: report
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Therapists in the U.S. say they have seen a rise in politically-related anxiety under the Trump presidency.

Though a condition has not been officially named, therapists and patients have referred to it as “Trump Anxiety Disorder,” according to a report from Canada’s CBC News.

Elisabeth LaMotte, the founder of the D.C. Counseling and Psychotherapy Center in Washington, D.C., told CBC that there is a “collective anxiety” among her patients related to President TrumpDonald John TrumpJoaquín Castro: Trump would be 'in court right now' if he weren't the president or 'privileged' Trump flubs speech location at criminal justice conference Comey reveals new details on Russia probe during House testimony MORE’s rhetoric and policies.

"There is a fear of the world ending," she said. "It's very disorienting and constantly unsettling."

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She said that Trump critics whom she treats exhibit similar behavior to patients who have a parent with a personality disorder.

"Whether it's conscious or not, I think we look to the president of the United States as a psychological parent," LaMotte said.

LaMotte told CBC that the “condition” is also common among Trump supporters, who often say they feel “isolated” by friends and family for aligning with the president or pulled into angry conversations.

Steve Stosny, another D.C. therapist, told CBC that he worked with a Trump administration official whose liberal-leaning wife and daughter were “starting to hate him.” The couple eventually decided to divorce, even though the husband left his post.

“The wife couldn't take it anymore,” Stosny said. “It's tough when one spouse is at war with the children."

Multiple therapists told CBC that they observed symptoms, including lack of sleep, excessive use of social media, feelings of losing control and helplessness, in their patients that they attributed to Trump-related anxiety.

National data indicates support for their findings.

The American Psychological Association (APA) found in a recent online survey that stress levels following the election are the highest they’ve been in a decade. And the majority of respondents reported stress over the 2016 election and the future of the nation as factors.

The APA also found a correlation between stress levels and electronic news consumption.

Therapists told CBC that in recent months, patients have indicated that separation of migrant families at the border, the retirement of Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy and Trump’s various feuds with other world leaders have all been triggers for “Trump Anxiety Disorder.”