McCain refused to let Manafort run 2008 convention due to Russia ties: report
© Getty images

The late Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainPublisher announces McSally book planned for May release Democrats lead Trump by wide margins in Minnesota Here's what to watch this week on impeachment MORE (R-Ariz.) rejected a bid from Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortEx-Clinton lawyer predicts at least one count of obstruction of justice from Trump impeachment inquiry New York City lawmakers vote to close Rikers Island jail by 2026 Perry says Trump directed him to discuss Ukraine with Giuliani: report MORE, President TrumpDonald John TrumpGraham to introduce resolution condemning House impeachment inquiry Support for impeachment inches up in poll Fox News's Bret Baier calls Trump's attacks on media 'a problem' MORE's former campaign chairman, to manage the 2008 Republican National Convention because of concerns over Manafort's association with Russian oligarchs, The Atlantic reported Monday.

The news outlet reported that McCain's 2008 campaign manager, Rick Davis, worked with Manafort for years at a lobbying firm. One of the firm's top clients was Russian billionaire Oleg Deripaska, an ally of Russian President Vladimir Putin who was recently the subject of U.S. sanctions.

Davis and Manafort reportedly helped Deripaska interact with McCain in the months leading up to the 2008 presidential campaign. Deripaska reportedly hosted a party on a yacht near Montenegro to mark McCain's 70th birthday.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Atlantic reported that McCain grew concerned after he learned Manafort was allegedly entangled with Russian oligarchs. An aide for the late senator told the news outlet that McCain ordered Manafort and Davis to cut ties with pro-Russia clients. 

In the months that followed, Manafort wanted to head efforts to organize the Republican National Convention. However, McCain turned him down amid evidence of his ties to individuals with Kremlin links, The Atlantic reported.

Manafort was convicted last week on eight charges of bank fraud and tax fraud. The charges were largely connected to his income from pro-Russia lobbying work in Ukraine. The judge declared a mistrial on 10 other counts after the jury could not reach a unanimous decision.

McCain died on Saturday at age 81 a little over a year after being diagnosed with an aggressive form of brain cancer.

McCain is scheduled to lie in the Arizona State Capitol on Wednesday and the U.S. Capitol on Friday. He will be buried at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., on Sunday.