McCain refused to let Manafort run 2008 convention due to Russia ties: report
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The late Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMeghan McCain says Ben Carson should be developing brain cancer treatment, not working at HUD Graham urges Trump not to abandon infrastructure talks with Democrats Pelosi receives John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award MORE (R-Ariz.) rejected a bid from Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortHouse Democrat 'fixed' Trump's infographic about Mueller's investigation Michael Caputo eyes congressional bid Roger Stone considers suing to discover if he was spied on by FBI MORE, President TrumpDonald John TrumpFeinstein, Iranian foreign minister had dinner amid tensions: report The Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Harris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign MORE's former campaign chairman, to manage the 2008 Republican National Convention because of concerns over Manafort's association with Russian oligarchs, The Atlantic reported Monday.

The news outlet reported that McCain's 2008 campaign manager, Rick Davis, worked with Manafort for years at a lobbying firm. One of the firm's top clients was Russian billionaire Oleg Deripaska, an ally of Russian President Vladimir Putin who was recently the subject of U.S. sanctions.

Davis and Manafort reportedly helped Deripaska interact with McCain in the months leading up to the 2008 presidential campaign. Deripaska reportedly hosted a party on a yacht near Montenegro to mark McCain's 70th birthday.

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The Atlantic reported that McCain grew concerned after he learned Manafort was allegedly entangled with Russian oligarchs. An aide for the late senator told the news outlet that McCain ordered Manafort and Davis to cut ties with pro-Russia clients. 

In the months that followed, Manafort wanted to head efforts to organize the Republican National Convention. However, McCain turned him down amid evidence of his ties to individuals with Kremlin links, The Atlantic reported.

Manafort was convicted last week on eight charges of bank fraud and tax fraud. The charges were largely connected to his income from pro-Russia lobbying work in Ukraine. The judge declared a mistrial on 10 other counts after the jury could not reach a unanimous decision.

McCain died on Saturday at age 81 a little over a year after being diagnosed with an aggressive form of brain cancer.

McCain is scheduled to lie in the Arizona State Capitol on Wednesday and the U.S. Capitol on Friday. He will be buried at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., on Sunday.