Biden on bomb threats: 'This ugliness has to end'
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Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenFacebook, Twitter CEOs to testify before Senate Judiciary Committee on Nov. 17 Sanders hits back at Trump's attack on 'socialized medicine' Senate GOP to drop documentary series days before election hitting China, Democrats over coronavirus MORE on Wednesday called for an end to "division," "hatred" and "ugliness" as Democratic leaders denounced suspected explosive devices mailed to a number of prominent party members including former President Obama.

"This country has to come together. This division, this hatred, this ugliness has to end," Biden wrote on Twitter.

Biden joined a chorus of national Democrats and potential 2020 presidential candidates who spoke out forcefully against the threats against public officials.

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Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenFinal debate: War Admiral vs. Seabiscuit Biden defends his health plan from Trump attacks Progressives blast Biden plan to form panel on Supreme Court reform MORE (D-Mass.) thanked law enforcement and warned that such violence "has no place in our democracy."

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders hits back at Trump's attack on 'socialized medicine' Trump's debate performance was too little, too late Final debate: War Admiral vs. Seabiscuit MORE (I-Vt.), another potential 2020 candidate, echoed Warren's message and called the threats "deeply disturbing."

"In this country we battle with words and ideas, not fists and bombs," he tweeted. "Acts of violence, appeals to violence and condoning violence have no place in American society."

Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDemocratic senators unveil bill to ban discrimination in financial services industry Obama endorses Espy in Mississippi Senate race Durbin says he will run for No. 2 spot if Dems win Senate majority MORE (D-N.J.) decried the packages as "targeted acts of terror" that showed "despicable cowardice."

The Secret Service said it intercepted explosive devices earlier Wednesday that were addressed to Obama in Washington, D.C., as well as another for Hillary and Bill Clinton the previous day in New York.

Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBon Jovi to campaign with Biden in Pennsylvania The Hill's Campaign Report: 2020 spending wars | Biden looks to clean up oil comments | Debate ratings are in Biden gets late boost with key union endorsement MORE addressed the bomb threat during a stop in Florida on Wednesday to support gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum (D). She lamented the "deep divisions" in politics, and urged Americans to "do everything we can to bring the country together." 

"We also have to elect candidates who will try to do the same," she added.

Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonThe Hill's Campaign Report: Trump, Biden face off for last time on the debate stage Trump expected to bring Hunter Biden's former business partner to debate Davis: On eve of tonight's debate — we've seen this moment in history before MORE later thanked law enforcement for its efforts.

Authorities also responded on Wednesday after a suspicious device was mailed to the New York offices of CNN.

The package was addressed to former CIA Director John BrennanJohn Owen Brennan50 former intelligence officials warn NY Post story sounds like Russian disinformation Not treason, not a crime — but definitely a gross abuse of power Trump fires off dozens of tweets while recuperating at White House MORE, who appears occasionally on the network but works as a contributor for MSNBC.

Capitol Police later in the day said they had intercepted a suspicious package mailed to Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersCompanies start responding to pressure to bolster minority representation Democratic senators unveil bill to ban discrimination in financial services industry Safeguarding US elections by sanctioning Russian sovereign debt MORE (D-Calif.), one of Trump's most vocal critics on Capitol Hill.

Former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderAlarm grows over Trump team's efforts to monitor polls The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden on Trump: 'He'll leave' l GOP laywers brush off Trump's election remarks l Obama's endorsements Obama endorses Warnock in crowded Georgia Senate race MORE was also the addressee on a similar package, though it was sent to the wrong address.

A similar device was discovered in the mailbox at the home of billionaire philanthropist George Soros late Monday. Soros is an ardent supporter of liberal causes and Democratic politicians, and is the subject of conspiracy theories pushed by some conservative figures.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpIvanka Trump, Jared Kusher's lawyer threatens to sue Lincoln Project over Times Square billboards Facebook, Twitter CEOs to testify before Senate Judiciary Committee on Nov. 17 Sanders hits back at Trump's attack on 'socialized medicine' MORE on Wednesday afternoon called the attacks "egregious" and "abhorrent to everything we hold dear and sacred as Americans." He called for national unity, and said a "major federal investigation" is underway.

"I just want to tell you that in these times, we have to unify. We have to come together and send one very clear, strong unmistakable message that acts or threats of political violence of any kind have no place in the Untied States of America,” Trump said at a White House event where he signed an anti-opioid addiction bill into law.

Some critics have suggested the president has inflamed political divisions by labeling Democrats an "angry mob" and attacking CNN and other outlets as the "enemy of the people."

Republicans and Democrats have been quick to condemn the suspicious packages this week and have called for cooler heads to prevail.