Biden on bomb threats: 'This ugliness has to end'
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Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump second-term plans remain a mystery to GOP Susan Rice: Trump picks Putin over troops 'even when it comes to the blood of American service members' Does Donald Trump even want a second term? MORE on Wednesday called for an end to "division," "hatred" and "ugliness" as Democratic leaders denounced suspected explosive devices mailed to a number of prominent party members including former President Obama.

"This country has to come together. This division, this hatred, this ugliness has to end," Biden wrote on Twitter.

Biden joined a chorus of national Democrats and potential 2020 presidential candidates who spoke out forcefully against the threats against public officials.

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Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenSusan Rice sees stock rise in Biden VP race The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden chips away at Trump's fundraising advantage Warnock raises almost M in Georgia Senate race in second quarter MORE (D-Mass.) thanked law enforcement and warned that such violence "has no place in our democracy."

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Memo: Unhappy voters could deliver political shocks beyond Trump Democratic senator will introduce bill mandating social distancing on flights after flying on packed plane Neil Young opposes use of his music at Trump Mount Rushmore event: 'I stand in solidarity with the Lakota Sioux' MORE (I-Vt.), another potential 2020 candidate, echoed Warren's message and called the threats "deeply disturbing."

"In this country we battle with words and ideas, not fists and bombs," he tweeted. "Acts of violence, appeals to violence and condoning violence have no place in American society."

Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerSenators push foreign media to disclose if they are registered as foreign agents Joe Biden must release the results of his cognitive tests — voters need to know GOP senators debate replacing Columbus Day with Juneteenth as a federal holiday MORE (D-N.J.) decried the packages as "targeted acts of terror" that showed "despicable cowardice."

The Secret Service said it intercepted explosive devices earlier Wednesday that were addressed to Obama in Washington, D.C., as well as another for Hillary and Bill Clinton the previous day in New York.

Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSusan Rice sees stock rise in Biden VP race Democrats try to turn now into November The Memo: Unhappy voters could deliver political shocks beyond Trump MORE addressed the bomb threat during a stop in Florida on Wednesday to support gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum (D). She lamented the "deep divisions" in politics, and urged Americans to "do everything we can to bring the country together." 

"We also have to elect candidates who will try to do the same," she added.

Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonPoll finds Biden with narrow lead over Trump in Missouri Trump's mark on federal courts could last decades Obama, Clinton join virtual celebration for Negro Leagues MORE later thanked law enforcement for its efforts.

Authorities also responded on Wednesday after a suspicious device was mailed to the New York offices of CNN.

The package was addressed to former CIA Director John BrennanJohn Owen BrennanGraham postpones Russia probe subpoena vote as tensions boil over GOP votes to give chairman authority to subpoena Obama officials Rosenstein takes fire from Republicans in heated testimony MORE, who appears occasionally on the network but works as a contributor for MSNBC.

Capitol Police later in the day said they had intercepted a suspicious package mailed to Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersOn The Money: Mnuchin, Powell differ over how soon economy will recover | Millions fear eviction without more aid from Congress | IRS chief pledges to work on tax code's role in racial wealth disparities Millions fear eviction without more aid from Congress House approves statehood for DC in 232-180 vote MORE (D-Calif.), one of Trump's most vocal critics on Capitol Hill.

Former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderTrump official criticizes ex-Clinton spokesman over defunding police tweet Obama to speak about George Floyd in virtual town hall GOP group launches redistricting site MORE was also the addressee on a similar package, though it was sent to the wrong address.

A similar device was discovered in the mailbox at the home of billionaire philanthropist George Soros late Monday. Soros is an ardent supporter of liberal causes and Democratic politicians, and is the subject of conspiracy theories pushed by some conservative figures.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump second-term plans remain a mystery to GOP Trump to hold outdoor rally in New Hampshire on Saturday Eighty-eight years of debt pieties MORE on Wednesday afternoon called the attacks "egregious" and "abhorrent to everything we hold dear and sacred as Americans." He called for national unity, and said a "major federal investigation" is underway.

"I just want to tell you that in these times, we have to unify. We have to come together and send one very clear, strong unmistakable message that acts or threats of political violence of any kind have no place in the Untied States of America,” Trump said at a White House event where he signed an anti-opioid addiction bill into law.

Some critics have suggested the president has inflamed political divisions by labeling Democrats an "angry mob" and attacking CNN and other outlets as the "enemy of the people."

Republicans and Democrats have been quick to condemn the suspicious packages this week and have called for cooler heads to prevail.