Biden on bomb threats: 'This ugliness has to end'
© Getty Images

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHouse unravels with rise of 'Les Enfants Terrible' Sanders to call on 2020 Democrats to reject money from drug, health insurance industries Harris tops Biden in California 2020 poll MORE on Wednesday called for an end to "division," "hatred" and "ugliness" as Democratic leaders denounced suspected explosive devices mailed to a number of prominent party members including former President Obama.

"This country has to come together. This division, this hatred, this ugliness has to end," Biden wrote on Twitter.

Biden joined a chorus of national Democrats and potential 2020 presidential candidates who spoke out forcefully against the threats against public officials.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenHarris tops Biden in California 2020 poll The Hill's Morning Report - A raucous debate on race ends with Trump admonishment Democrats fret over Trump cash machine MORE (D-Mass.) thanked law enforcement and warned that such violence "has no place in our democracy."

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders to call on 2020 Democrats to reject money from drug, health insurance industries The hidden connection between immigration and health care: Our long-term care crisis Harris tops Biden in California 2020 poll MORE (I-Vt.), another potential 2020 candidate, echoed Warren's message and called the threats "deeply disturbing."

"In this country we battle with words and ideas, not fists and bombs," he tweeted. "Acts of violence, appeals to violence and condoning violence have no place in American society."

Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerThe Hill's Morning Report - A raucous debate on race ends with Trump admonishment Lawmakers pay tribute to late Justice Stevens Schumer throws support behind bill to study reparations MORE (D-N.J.) decried the packages as "targeted acts of terror" that showed "despicable cowardice."

The Secret Service said it intercepted explosive devices earlier Wednesday that were addressed to Obama in Washington, D.C., as well as another for Hillary and Bill Clinton the previous day in New York.

Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump thanks 'vicious young Socialist Congresswomen' for his poll numbers Will Trump's racist tweets backfire? Democrats fret over Trump cash machine MORE addressed the bomb threat during a stop in Florida on Wednesday to support gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum (D). She lamented the "deep divisions" in politics, and urged Americans to "do everything we can to bring the country together." 

"We also have to elect candidates who will try to do the same," she added.

Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonMore adult Twitter users follow Obama than Trump: survey Pro-impeachment Democrats wary of Al Green's floor vote push Marching toward a debt crisis MORE later thanked law enforcement for its efforts.

Authorities also responded on Wednesday after a suspicious device was mailed to the New York offices of CNN.

The package was addressed to former CIA Director John BrennanJohn Owen BrennanWebb: Questions for Robert Mueller A brief timeline of Trump's clashes with intelligence director Dan Coats Trump critic Brennan praises his Iran decision: I 'applaud' him MORE, who appears occasionally on the network but works as a contributor for MSNBC.

Capitol Police later in the day said they had intercepted a suspicious package mailed to Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersSenators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency at hearing Democrat Sherrod Brown torches Facebook at hearing: They 'broke journalism,' 'helped incite a genocide' House Democrats mull bill to ban Facebook cryptocurrency project MORE (D-Calif.), one of Trump's most vocal critics on Capitol Hill.

Former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderFeds will not charge officer who killed Eric Garner The old 'state rights' and the new state power The Hill's Morning Report — Harris brings her A game to Miami debate MORE was also the addressee on a similar package, though it was sent to the wrong address.

A similar device was discovered in the mailbox at the home of billionaire philanthropist George Soros late Monday. Soros is an ardent supporter of liberal causes and Democratic politicians, and is the subject of conspiracy theories pushed by some conservative figures.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpPompeo changes staff for Russia meeting after concerns raised about top negotiator's ties: report House unravels with rise of 'Les Enfants Terrible' Ben Carson: Trump is not a racist and his comments were not racist MORE on Wednesday afternoon called the attacks "egregious" and "abhorrent to everything we hold dear and sacred as Americans." He called for national unity, and said a "major federal investigation" is underway.

"I just want to tell you that in these times, we have to unify. We have to come together and send one very clear, strong unmistakable message that acts or threats of political violence of any kind have no place in the Untied States of America,” Trump said at a White House event where he signed an anti-opioid addiction bill into law.

Some critics have suggested the president has inflamed political divisions by labeling Democrats an "angry mob" and attacking CNN and other outlets as the "enemy of the people."

Republicans and Democrats have been quick to condemn the suspicious packages this week and have called for cooler heads to prevail.