Utah Senate candidate Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyTrump's no racist — he's an equal opportunity offender Lawmakers introduce bill to block U.S. companies from doing business with Huawei GOP put on the back foot by Trump's race storm MORE said Wednesday that a series of suspicious packages sent to prominent Democratic officials were "sadly unsurprising" given the country's "rabid" political rhetoric.

"Disgusting, vile threats and actions against fellow Americans and our institutions are sadly unsurprising: hate acts follow hate speech," Romney tweeted.

"It is past time for us to turn down and tune out the rabid rhetoric," the 2012 GOP presidential candidate added.

The Secret Service intercepted packages earlier Wednesday addressed to former President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaTrump averages highest approval rating of his presidency in second quarter: Gallup The Hill's Morning Report - Trump seizes House impeachment vote to rally GOP Democrats warm to idea of studying reparations MORE and Bill and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillary Clinton slams Trump rally: 'The time has come again' to fight for democracy Trump blasts minority Democrats, rally crowd chants 'send her back' The Memo: Democrats debate Trump response – 'Being righteous and losing sucks' MORE. A similar package arrived Wednesday morning at CNN's New York City offices addressed to former CIA Director John BrennanJohn Owen BrennanWebb: Questions for Robert Mueller A brief timeline of Trump's clashes with intelligence director Dan Coats Trump critic Brennan praises his Iran decision: I 'applaud' him MORE.

Authorities have also intercepted packages addressed to Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersHere are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Maxine Waters says her committee will call in Zuckerberg to testify about Libra Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers struggle to understand Facebook's Libra project | EU hits Amazon with antitrust probe | New cybersecurity concerns over census | Robocall, election security bills head to House floor | Privacy questions over FaceApp MORE (D-Calif.) and former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderFeds will not charge officer who killed Eric Garner The old 'state rights' and the new state power The Hill's Morning Report — Harris brings her A game to Miami debate MORE. The packages reportedly had Rep. Debbie Wasserman SchultzDeborah (Debbie) Wasserman SchultzEpstein charges show Congress must act to protect children from abuse NYT: Don't make Acosta a political martyr Epstein charges put Trump Labor secretary back in spotlight MORE's (D) contact information listed for the return address. Wasserman Schultz said she is "deeply disturbed" that her name was attached.

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A similar device was discovered Monday at the home of billionaire philanthropist George Soros late Monday. Soros is an ardent supporter of liberal causes and Democratic politicians, and has been the subject of conspiracy theories pushed by far-right figures and some conservative politicians.

During his administration, President TrumpDonald John TrumpAmash responds to 'Send her back' chants at Trump rally: 'This is how history's worst episodes begin' McConnell: Trump 'on to something' with attacks on Dem congresswomen Trump blasts 'corrupt' Puerto Rico's leaders amid political crisis MORE has explicitly criticized each of the individuals who were targeted by the suspicious packages. In remarks at the White House, the president called for unity and pledged a full investigation, but did not mention any of the people targeted by name.

"I just want to tell you that in these times, we have to unify," Trump said. "We have to come together and send one very clear, strong, unmistakable message that acts or threats of political violence of any kind have no place in the Untied States of America."

Numerous Republicans and Democrats condemned the acts and called for an easing of political hostilities.

Some lawmakers and Democratic leaders have pointed to Trump's attacks of Democrats at campaign rallies and elsewhere. He has labeled the Democratic Party an "angry mob," and attacked news outlets as the "enemy of the people."

Republicans have, in recent months, seized on protests from liberal activists, some of whom have confronted lawmakers in public, as a sign of deteriorating discourse.

Romney has periodically criticized Trump's rhetoric as he campaigns to replace retiring Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchTrump to award racing legend Roger Penske with Presidential Medal of Freedom Trump awards Presidential Medal of Freedom to economist, former Reagan adviser Arthur Laffer Second ex-Senate staffer charged in aiding doxxing of GOP senators MORE (R-Utah). The former Massachusetts governor was once an ardent critic of Trump during the 2016 presidential campaign, calling him a "phony."

He has since said that he agrees with many of the president's policies, and will speak out on issues of "substantial significance."