Possible Nielsen replacement Tom Homan: ‘She’s working hard and doing a good job’
© Greg Nash

Former acting director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Tom Homan downplayed speculation on Wednesday that he may be considered as a replacement for Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenElection security bills face GOP buzzsaw Election security bills face GOP buzzsaw Five memorable moments from Sarah Sanders at the White House MORE.

"I’m not going to speculate on what the president’s going to do. I think we have a strong secretary," Homan said on "Fox & Friends."

"If the president’s going to make a change, that’s certainly his prerogative, but I really don’t want to speculate what the president’s going to do," he added.

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Homan defended Nielsen, and praised her for addressing immigration, despite the fraught nature of the issue.

"It’s a 24/7, 365 job," he said. "You can’t win on this topic because it’s so divisive, so controversial, so emotional, but I think she’s working hard and doing a good job."

Homan retired as head of ICE in June due to "family and personal considerations" after more than a year on the job.

Politico reported Tuesday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says 'Failing New York Times' should be held 'fully accountable' over Russia report Trump says 'Failing New York Times' should be held 'fully accountable' over Russia report Trump tweets ICE will begin removing 'millions' of undocumented migrants MORE is considering Homan as a possible replacement for Nielsen, whose time in the administration is reportedly limited.

Trump has reportedly decided to oust Nielsen in the coming weeks, and may do so as soon as this week. Nielsen has led DHS since December 2017, when she was confirmed to replace now-White House chief of Staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE.

The president is said to have lashed out at Nielsen on multiple occasions over disdain for the administration's lack of hard-line action on immigration.

The DHS secretary fiercely defended a "zero tolerance" policy earlier this year that led to the separation of thousands of migrant families who illegally crossed the border.