Nearly six in ten want someone other than Trump elected president in 2020: poll
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Roughly 60 percent of Americans said in a new poll that they don't want to see President TrumpDonald John TrumpChelsea Clinton announces birth of third child Ukrainian officials and Giuliani are sharing back-channel campaign information: report Trump attacks 'the Squad' as 'racist group of troublemakers' MORE re-elected in 2020.

The Monmouth University Poll found that 36 percent of Americans support Trump's second term, while 59 percent indicated they want to see someone new in the White House after the next presidential election.

Sixteen percent of Republicans said they would rather have a new president, according to the poll, compared to 92 percent of Democrats and 59 percent of independents said the same.

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Trump's approval rating has consistently hovered in the low 40 percent range in Monmouth's polling. This month's survey found 43 percent of respondents approve of the president, while 49 percent disapprove. Those figures are largely unchanged from an August poll.

Wednesday's poll surveyed 802 people from Nov. 9-12 -- a few days after the midterms --  and has a margin of error of 3.5 percentage points.

With the midterm elections in the rearview mirror, a number of Democrats are expected to officially announce in the coming months whether they will campaign for the presidency in 2020.

Among those who are could make up a crowded field of candidates are Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenWarren warns another 'economic crash' is coming The Hill's Morning Report — Mueller Time: Dems, GOP ready questions for high-stakes testimony Biden's lead narrows in early voting states: poll MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisThe Hill's Morning Report — Mueller Time: Dems, GOP ready questions for high-stakes testimony Biden's lead narrows in early voting states: poll New CBS poll shows Biden with 7-point lead in New Hampshire MORE (D-Calif.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandHarris faces pressure to define policy proposals Democratic strategist predicts most 2020 candidates will drop out in late fall The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump hits media over 'send her back' coverage MORE (D-N.Y.) Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownThe Hill's Morning Report - A raucous debate on race ends with Trump admonishment On The Money: Senators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency | Tech giants on defensive at antitrust hearing | Democrats ask Labor Department to investigate Amazon warehouses Hillicon Valley: Senators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency plan | Trump vows to 'take a look' at Google's ties to China | Google denies working with China's military | Tech execs on defensive at antitrust hearing | Bill would bar business with Huawei MORE (D-Ohio), and Bernie SandersBernie Sanders'Medicare for All': The hype v. Maryland's reality Biden says he supports paying campaign staff minimum wage Biden's lead narrows in early voting states: poll MORE (I-Vt.), as well as former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenUkrainian officials and Giuliani are sharing back-channel campaign information: report The Hill's Morning Report — Mueller Time: Dems, GOP ready questions for high-stakes testimony Biden campaign taps foreign policy vet Nicholas Burns as adviser: report MORE and Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellHere are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Moulton campaign makes formal case to DNC to be added to debate stage Bullock makes CNN debate stage MORE (D-Calif.).

Trump has recently lashed out at Warren, Biden and others during campaign rallies and in interviews, presaging potential clashes on the 2020 campaign trail.

Trump filed paperwork to run for re-election in 2020 on the day he was inaugurated in 2017. Last week, Vice President Pence confirmed he will run on the ticket with Trump after the president was asked about it during a press conference.