Filmmaker Michael Moore said in a new interview that there is only one candidate up to the challenge to “crush” President TrumpDonald John TrumpWatergate prosecutor says that Sondland testimony was 'tipping point' for Trump In private moment with Trump, Justice Kennedy pushed for Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination: book Obama: 'Everybody needs to chill out' about differences between 2020 candidates MORE in 2020, “and her last name rhymes with Obama.”

“In fact, it is Obama — Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaMichelle Obama and Ellen Degeneres sing duet about latest book Michelle Obama receives Grammy nomination for audio version of memoir Hundreds turn out to see Michelle Obama on one-year anniversary of 'Becoming' MORE,” Moore said on MSNBC. “Everybody watching this right now knows she is a beloved American and she would go in there and she would beat him.”

Moore said it is not enough to have a Democratic candidate who will defeat Trump, noting that his 2016 Democratic opponent, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDemocratic strategist laments 'low bar' for Biden debate performance Wasserman Schultz makes bid for House Appropriations Committee gavel Trump to hold campaign rally in Pennsylvania next month MORE, won 3 million more votes nationwide. 

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“The only way to remove Trump is to crush Trump. And that’s the question that has to be asked, who can crush Trump? Who’s the street fighter?” Moore said. 

He said four of the Democratic presidential candidates — former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance Watergate prosecutor says that Sondland testimony was 'tipping point' for Trump Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Deal on defense bill proves elusive | Hill, Holmes offer damaging testimony | Trump vows to block Navy from ousting officer from SEALs MORE, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance Warren speech in Georgia interrupted by pro-charter school protesters Hillicon Valley: Senators ask Trump to halt Huawei licenses | Warren criticizes Zuckerberg over secret dinner with Trump | Senior DHS cyber official to leave | Dems offer bill on Libra oversight MORE (D-Mass.), Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance Wasserman Schultz makes bid for House Appropriations Committee gavel Overnight Health Care: Crunch time for Congress on surprise medical bills | CDC confirms 47 vaping-related deaths | Massachusetts passes flavored tobacco, vaping products ban MORE (I-Vt.) and Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance On The Money: Trump signs short-term spending bill to avoid shutdown | Pelosi casts doubt on USMCA deal in 2019 | California high court strikes down law targeting Trump tax returns Democratic strategist laments 'low bar' for Biden debate performance MORE (D-Calif.) — could beat Trump. But he said that is not enough. 

Obama, he said, would be able to crush Trump. 

“She would beat him in the debates, he wouldn’t be able to bully her, he wouldn’t be able to nickname her,” he said. 

Moore cited Obama’s popular tour for her memoir “Becoming." 

“She takes the stage and she’s so powerful and so good you just look at that and think of course she could win,” he said. 

Obama, however, is not among the vast field of two dozen Democrats looking to face Trump in 2020. 

“Well, has anyone asked her?” Moore said. “If asked to serve, I believe she would serve.”

Obama is the most admired woman in the world, according to a July YouGov poll, beating out Oprah WinfreyOprah Gail WinfreyTexas court grants indefinite stay on Rodney Reed execution Democratic handwringing hits new highs over 2020 Famous gingers Prince Harry, Ed Sheeran team up for World Mental Health Day MORE, Angelina Jolie and Queen Elizabeth II. 

A former lawyer and University of Chicago dean, she has made no indication that she intends to run for the presidency or any other office. 

The Obamas are likely to hold out on endorsing a candidate until one is chosen by the party. 

A spokesperson for the Obamas did not immediately respond to a request for comment.