Answering questions at what is likely his final overseas press conference, President Obama said he's not worried about being the last Democratic president — "not even for a while." 

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Obama made the remarks at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit on Sunday. 

The president was asked for his take on the Democratic Party, following losses across the board on Election Day. Over the summer, former President George W. Bush told a group of aides he feared he'd be the last Republican president. 

In response, Obama said, "I'm not worried about being the last Democratic president — not even for a while."

"The Democratic nominee won the popular vote," he added of his former secretary of State, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham Clinton2016 pollsters erred by not weighing education on state level, says political analyst Could President Trump's talk of a 'red wave' cause his supporters to stay home in midterms? Dem group targets Trump in M voter registration campaign: report MORE.

But he said the party has "some thinking to do" about its message and strategy going forward. 

Asked about how Democrats in Congress might interact with President Donald Trump once he takes office, Obama said he hoped they'd work together when possible.

"I certainly don’t want them to do what Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFord's lawyer: Hearing doesn't appear to be designed for 'fair', 'respectful' treatment GOP opens door to holding Kavanaugh committee vote this week Press: Judge Kavanaugh must withdraw MORE did when I was elected," he said. 

In 2010, the Senate Republican leader said of his conference, "The single most important thing we want to achieve is for President Obama to be a one-term president."

He also came close to endorsing Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who is being challenged for her leadership position in the House. Rep. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio) jumped from relative obscurity into the spotlight this week when he launched a challenge to unseat Pelosi. 
 
"I think Nancy Pelosi is an outstanding and historic political leader," Obama said.