Lawmakers celebrate 100th anniversary of women getting the right to vote

House lawmakers took to social media on Tuesday to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the lower chamber passing the 19th Amendment, which guaranteed women's right to vote.

Several lawmakers posted pictures of themselves wearing yellow roses in honor of the anniversary, tweeting photos alongside the hashtag "WomensVote100."

"On this day 100 years ago, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote,” Rep. Donna ShalalaDonna Edna ShalalaOvernight Health Care: Kansas leaders reach deal to expand Medicaid | California to launch own prescription drug label | Dem senator offers bill banning e-cigarette flavors A solemn impeachment day on Capitol Hill Overnight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — House panel unveils rival fix for surprise medical bills | Democrats punt vote on youth vaping bill | Pelosi drug bill poised for passage after deal with progressives MORE (D-Fla.) tweeted Tuesday. “May we honor the suffragettes that came before us and continue to fight for the full equality of women & girls everywhere.”

“Today, 100 years later, I wear a yellow rose in honor of all American women — without their voices, our nation would not be where it is today,” Rep. Chuck FleischmannCharles (Chuck) Joseph FleischmannTrump roasts Republicans at private fundraising event Trump faces new hit on deficit Lawmakers concede they might have to pass a dreaded 'CR' MORE (R-Tenn.) wrote on Twitter.

"100 years ago, women fought for and won the right to vote. Today, more than 100 women, led by the remarkable @SpeakerPelosi, serve in the U.S. House of Representatives. I am so proud to be one of them! #WomensVote100" Rep. Frederica WilsonFrederica Patricia WilsonSanders wants one-on-one fight with Biden Biden endorsed by four more members of Congressional Black Caucus Teacher's union leader: DeVos is 'a cautionary tale' of presidential impact on public education MORE (D-Fla.) tweeted.

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Several other House members, including Reps. Brenda LawrenceBrenda Lulenar LawrenceHouse Democrat walks back remark favoring censure over impeachment Jane Fonda calls for protecting water resources at weekly DC climate protest DCCC adds senior staffers after summer departures MORE (D-Mich.), Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersKoch network could target almost 200 races in 2020, official says Lawmakers voice skepticism over Facebook's deepfake ban House Ethics Committee finds McMorris Rodgers misused official resources MORE (R-Wash.), Katie HillKatherine (Katie) Lauren HillCalifornia Democrat Christy Smith launches first TV ad in bid for Katie Hill's former House seat Cenk Uygur updates on Congressional campaign, how I will call out corporate politicians in Washington GOP leaders encourage retiring lawmakers to give up committee posts MORE (D-Calif.), Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira Cohen2019 in Photos: 35 pictures in politics Gabbard under fire for 'present' vote on impeachment Gabbard votes 'present' on impeaching Trump MORE (D-Tenn.), Antonio DelgadoAntonio Ramon Delgado Democrats plot new approach to win over rural voters The most expensive congressional races of the last decade How the 31 Democrats in Trump districts voted on impeachment MORE (D-N.Y.) and Ted LieuTed W. LieuDemocratic lawmaker dismisses GOP lawsuit threat: 'Take your letter and shove it' Democratic lawmaker says Nunes threatened to sue him over criticism Paralysis of nations is empowering cities MORE (D-Calif.) also tweeted their support of the anniversary. 

Rep. Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsBaltimore unveils plaques for courthouse to be named after Elijah Cummings GOP leaders encourage retiring lawmakers to give up committee posts Pelosi taps Virginia Democrat for key post on economic panel MORE (D-Md.) tweeted that the historic vote signaled taking “a step toward becoming a more fair society.”

The fight for the right to vote was known as the War of the Roses, during which anti-suffragists wore red roses to signify their opposition and suffragists chose to adopt the yellow rose as the symbol for their cause. The right for women to vote became law in 1920.