Lawmakers celebrate 100th anniversary of women getting the right to vote

House lawmakers took to social media on Tuesday to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the lower chamber passing the 19th Amendment, which guaranteed women's right to vote.

Several lawmakers posted pictures of themselves wearing yellow roses in honor of the anniversary, tweeting photos alongside the hashtag "WomensVote100."

"On this day 100 years ago, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote,” Rep. Donna ShalalaDonna Edna ShalalaLawmakers toast Greta Van Susteren's new show Overnight Health Care: Watchdog finds DEA allowed more opioids even as overdose deaths rose | Judge temporarily blocks Georgia abortion law | Three states report more vaping deaths | Dem proposes new fix for surprise medical bills Centrist Democrats fret over impeachment gamble MORE (D-Fla.) tweeted Tuesday. “May we honor the suffragettes that came before us and continue to fight for the full equality of women & girls everywhere.”

“Today, 100 years later, I wear a yellow rose in honor of all American women — without their voices, our nation would not be where it is today,” Rep. Chuck FleischmannCharles (Chuck) Joseph FleischmannTrump faces new hit on deficit Lawmakers concede they might have to pass a dreaded 'CR' GOP blasts Democrats for using 2014 'kids in cages' photo to promote migrant hearing MORE (R-Tenn.) wrote on Twitter.

"100 years ago, women fought for and won the right to vote. Today, more than 100 women, led by the remarkable @SpeakerPelosi, serve in the U.S. House of Representatives. I am so proud to be one of them! #WomensVote100" Rep. Frederica WilsonFrederica Patricia WilsonTen notable Democrats who do not favor impeachment Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress Democratic rep reconsiders wearing trademark hats because of 'racists who taunt me' MORE (D-Fla.) tweeted.

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Several other House members, including Reps. Brenda LawrenceBrenda Lulenar LawrenceMichigan House Democrats plan vigil for Iraqi man who died after deportation Democrats warn of Trump trap Democratic lawmaker: 'I love America even though at times she didn't love me back' MORE (D-Mich.), Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersSocial determinants of health — health care isn't just bugs and bacteria Lawmakers deride FTC settlement as weak on Facebook Overnight Energy: Fight over fuel standards intensifies | Democrats grill Trump officials over rule rollback | California official blasts EPA chief over broken talks | Former EPA official says Wheeler lied to Congress MORE (R-Wash.), Katie HillKatherine (Katie) Lauren HillLawmakers beat reporters in annual spelling bee competition Young insurgents aren't rushing to Kennedy's side in Markey fight Polling director: Young voters swayed by health care, economy, gun control MORE (D-Calif.), Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenTop Democrat holds moment of silence for Cummings at hearing The Hill's Morning Report - Trump eyes narrowly focused response to Iran attacks Lewandowski, Democrats tangle at testy hearing MORE (D-Tenn.), Antonio DelgadoAntonio Ramon DelgadoProgressive Latino group launches first incumbent protection campaign Trump impeachment battle hits TV ads Pelosi-backed group funding ads for vulnerable Democrats amid impeachment inquiry MORE (D-N.Y.) and Ted LieuTed W. LieuTestimony from GOP diplomat complicates Trump defense Lawmakers, social media users praise photo of Pelosi confronting Trump Democrats eye Pompeo testimony MORE (D-Calif.) also tweeted their support of the anniversary. 

Rep. Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsMichael Steele: Celebrating Elijah Cummings, a servant and a leader Republicans seek to delay effort to censure Schiff after Cummings' death House leaders offer tributes from floor to Elijah Cummings MORE (D-Md.) tweeted that the historic vote signaled taking “a step toward becoming a more fair society.”

The fight for the right to vote was known as the War of the Roses, during which anti-suffragists wore red roses to signify their opposition and suffragists chose to adopt the yellow rose as the symbol for their cause. The right for women to vote became law in 1920.