Lawmakers celebrate 100th anniversary of women getting the right to vote

House lawmakers took to social media on Tuesday to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the lower chamber passing the 19th Amendment, which guaranteed women's right to vote.

Several lawmakers posted pictures of themselves wearing yellow roses in honor of the anniversary, tweeting photos alongside the hashtag "WomensVote100."

"On this day 100 years ago, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote,” Rep. Donna ShalalaDonna Edna ShalalaOvernight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — Deal on surprise medical bills faces obstacles | House GOP unveils rival drug pricing measure ahead of Pelosi vote | Justices to hear case over billions in ObamaCare payments Three legal scholars say Trump should be impeached; one thinks otherwise Overnight Defense: Trump cancels presser, cuts short NATO trip | Viral video catches leaders appearing to gossip about Trump | Dem witnesses say Trump committed impeachable offenses | Trump reportedly mulling more troops in Middle East MORE (D-Fla.) tweeted Tuesday. “May we honor the suffragettes that came before us and continue to fight for the full equality of women & girls everywhere.”

“Today, 100 years later, I wear a yellow rose in honor of all American women — without their voices, our nation would not be where it is today,” Rep. Chuck FleischmannCharles (Chuck) Joseph FleischmannTrump roasts Republicans at private fundraising event Trump faces new hit on deficit Lawmakers concede they might have to pass a dreaded 'CR' MORE (R-Tenn.) wrote on Twitter.

"100 years ago, women fought for and won the right to vote. Today, more than 100 women, led by the remarkable @SpeakerPelosi, serve in the U.S. House of Representatives. I am so proud to be one of them! #WomensVote100" Rep. Frederica WilsonFrederica Patricia WilsonBlack lawmakers condemn Trump's 'lynching' remarks Ten notable Democrats who do not favor impeachment Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress MORE (D-Fla.) tweeted.

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Several other House members, including Reps. Brenda LawrenceBrenda Lulenar LawrenceHouse Democrat walks back remark favoring censure over impeachment Jane Fonda calls for protecting water resources at weekly DC climate protest DCCC adds senior staffers after summer departures MORE (D-Mich.), Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersIsraeli, Palestinian business leaders seek Trump boost for investment project The Suburban Caucus: Solutions for America's suburbs Shimkus announces he will stick with plan to retire after reconsidering MORE (R-Wash.), Katie HillKatherine (Katie) Lauren HillKatie Hill pens op-ed about Congress resignation, toxic marriage, mental health and resilience Young Turks founder: Past remarks on women were attempt 'to be a stupid, politically incorrect Republican' Feinstein endorses Christy Smith for Katie Hill's former House seat MORE (D-Calif.), Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenDemocrats unveil articles of impeachment against Trump The Hill's Morning Report - Dem dilemma on articles of impeachment Lawmakers to watch during Wednesday's impeachment hearing MORE (D-Tenn.), Antonio DelgadoAntonio Ramon DelgadoPowerful House panel to hold 'Medicare for All' hearing next week Overnight Health Care: Democratic group to only endorse AG candidates who back abortion rights | Protect Our Care launches seven-figure ad buy to boost vulnerable Dems | California sues Juul Group launches seven-figure ad buy boosting vulnerable Democrats on drug prices MORE (D-N.Y.) and Ted LieuTed W. LieuVideo of Princess Anne shrugging as Queen greets Trump goes viral Lawmakers to watch during Wednesday's impeachment hearing Adam Schiff's star rises with impeachment hearings MORE (D-Calif.) also tweeted their support of the anniversary. 

Rep. Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsTrump request for Ukrainian 'favor' tops notable quote list Impeachment can't wait Adam Schiff's star rises with impeachment hearings MORE (D-Md.) tweeted that the historic vote signaled taking “a step toward becoming a more fair society.”

The fight for the right to vote was known as the War of the Roses, during which anti-suffragists wore red roses to signify their opposition and suffragists chose to adopt the yellow rose as the symbol for their cause. The right for women to vote became law in 1920.