Lawmakers celebrate 100th anniversary of women getting the right to vote

House lawmakers took to social media on Tuesday to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the lower chamber passing the 19th Amendment, which guaranteed women's right to vote.

Several lawmakers posted pictures of themselves wearing yellow roses in honor of the anniversary, tweeting photos alongside the hashtag "WomensVote100."

"On this day 100 years ago, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote,” Rep. Donna ShalalaDonna Edna ShalalaRepublican Salazar seeks rematch with Shalala in key Miami House district House passes temporary immigration protections for Venezuelans Lawmakers pay tribute to late Justice Stevens MORE (D-Fla.) tweeted Tuesday. “May we honor the suffragettes that came before us and continue to fight for the full equality of women & girls everywhere.”

“Today, 100 years later, I wear a yellow rose in honor of all American women — without their voices, our nation would not be where it is today,” Rep. Chuck FleischmannCharles (Chuck) Joseph FleischmannTrump faces new hit on deficit Lawmakers concede they might have to pass a dreaded 'CR' GOP blasts Democrats for using 2014 'kids in cages' photo to promote migrant hearing MORE (R-Tenn.) wrote on Twitter.

"100 years ago, women fought for and won the right to vote. Today, more than 100 women, led by the remarkable @SpeakerPelosi, serve in the U.S. House of Representatives. I am so proud to be one of them! #WomensVote100" Rep. Frederica WilsonFrederica Patricia WilsonAssault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress Democratic rep reconsiders wearing trademark hats because of 'racists who taunt me' Overnight Defense: US shoots down Iranian drone | Pentagon sending 500 more troops to Saudi Arabia | Trump mulls Turkey sanctions | Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract MORE (D-Fla.) tweeted.

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Several other House members, including Reps. Brenda LawrenceBrenda Lulenar LawrenceMichigan House Democrats plan vigil for Iraqi man who died after deportation Democrats warn of Trump trap Democratic lawmaker: 'I love America even though at times she didn't love me back' MORE (D-Mich.), Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersLawmakers deride FTC settlement as weak on Facebook Overnight Energy: Fight over fuel standards intensifies | Democrats grill Trump officials over rule rollback | California official blasts EPA chief over broken talks | Former EPA official says Wheeler lied to Congress EPA head clashes with California over how car emissions negotiations broke down MORE (R-Wash.), Katie HillKatherine (Katie) Lauren HillAnti-Trump vets join Steyer group in pressing Democrats to impeach Trump House Dems, Senate GOP build money edge to protect majorities Live coverage: House Oversight examines Trump family separation policy MORE (D-Calif.), Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenHouse Democrats inch toward majority support for impeachment The Hill's Morning Report — Mueller Time: Dems, GOP ready questions for high-stakes testimony This week: Mueller dominates chaotic week on Capitol Hill MORE (D-Tenn.), Antonio DelgadoAntonio Ramon DelgadoMueller report fades from political conversation Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress The 11 House Dems from Trump districts who support assault weapons ban MORE (D-N.Y.) and Ted LieuTed W. LieuCities are the future: We need to coordinate their international diplomacy George Conway opposes #unfollowTrump movement Puerto Rico resignations spur constitutional crisis MORE (D-Calif.) also tweeted their support of the anniversary. 

Rep. Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsHouse committee heads demand Coast Guard Academy explain handling of harassment allegations Can the Democrats unseat Trump? Democrats slam alleged politicization of Trump State Department after IG report MORE (D-Md.) tweeted that the historic vote signaled taking “a step toward becoming a more fair society.”

The fight for the right to vote was known as the War of the Roses, during which anti-suffragists wore red roses to signify their opposition and suffragists chose to adopt the yellow rose as the symbol for their cause. The right for women to vote became law in 1920.