President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaYoung, diverse voters fueled Biden victory over Trump Biden's relationship with top House Republican is frosty The Memo: The Obamas unbound, on race MORE and Democratic leaders in Congress should swear off any major action during a lame-duck Congress, a Republican senator said Friday.

Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerThe unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  The Republicans' deep dive into nativism Fox News inks contributor deal with former Democratic House member MORE (R-Tenn.) said if Democrats want to add stability to the economy, they should pledge not to move legislation that might not otherwise pass during the congressional session following Election Day.

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"I think one of the great things the administration can do to cause people to settle down is to say, absolutely, that they would oppose any great activity in a lame-duck session," Corker said during an appearance on CNBC.

Republicans have expressed worry that Democrats might look to move some of their top legislative priorities that have stalled over the past year and a half in a lame-duck Congress, when retiring or defeated lawmakers might feel more liberated to cast their vote in favor of some measures.

Adding to those fears have been some Democrats and the White House itself, who have signaled that a lame-duck session could be useful. Sen. Tom HarkinThomas (Tom) Richard HarkinWe need a voting rights workaround Romney's TRUST Act is a Trojan Horse to cut seniors' benefits Two more parting shots from Trump aimed squarely at disabled workers MORE (D-Iowa) has said elements of the Employee Free Choice Act (EFCA, or "card-check") could move during such a session, and White House press secretary Robert Gibbs suggested on Thursday that a lame-duck session could be used to pass a free trade agreement with South Korea.

Corker called on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Calif.) and Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidBottom line Biden's first 100 days is stylistic 'antithesis' of Trump The Memo: Washington's fake debate on 'bipartisanship' MORE (Nev.), the Democratic leaders in their respective chambers, to make a similar pledge.

"I think for Harry Reid and Nancy Pelosi to say the same thing — that they're not going to try to use the lame-duck session as a place to do things that otherwise would not pass," he said. "That type of thinking, that concern about ... cap-and-trade and other types of policies just feeds into this whole unpredictability issue, the issue of what's going to happen in Washington. We need to move away from that uncertainty."