President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaObama meets with Greta Thunberg: 'One of our planet's greatest advocates' Trump: Cokie Roberts 'never treated me nicely' but 'was a professional' Obama, Bush among those paying tribute to Cokie Roberts: 'A trailblazing figure' MORE and Democratic leaders in Congress should swear off any major action during a lame-duck Congress, a Republican senator said Friday.

Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerTrump announces, endorses ambassador to Japan's Tennessee Senate bid Meet the key Senate player in GOP fight over Saudi Arabia Trump says he's 'very happy' some GOP senators have 'gone on to greener pastures' MORE (R-Tenn.) said if Democrats want to add stability to the economy, they should pledge not to move legislation that might not otherwise pass during the congressional session following Election Day.

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"I think one of the great things the administration can do to cause people to settle down is to say, absolutely, that they would oppose any great activity in a lame-duck session," Corker said during an appearance on CNBC.

Republicans have expressed worry that Democrats might look to move some of their top legislative priorities that have stalled over the past year and a half in a lame-duck Congress, when retiring or defeated lawmakers might feel more liberated to cast their vote in favor of some measures.

Adding to those fears have been some Democrats and the White House itself, who have signaled that a lame-duck session could be useful. Sen. Tom HarkinThomas (Tom) Richard HarkinWisconsin lawmaker gets buzz-cut after vowing not to cut hair until sign language bill passed Democratic debates kick off Iowa summer sprint Key endorsements: A who's who in early states MORE (D-Iowa) has said elements of the Employee Free Choice Act (EFCA, or "card-check") could move during such a session, and White House press secretary Robert Gibbs suggested on Thursday that a lame-duck session could be used to pass a free trade agreement with South Korea.

Corker called on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Calif.) and Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidHarry Reid warns Trump 'can be reelected' Homeland Security Republican accuses Navy of withholding UFO info Poll: 47 percent back limits on Senate filibuster MORE (Nev.), the Democratic leaders in their respective chambers, to make a similar pledge.

"I think for Harry Reid and Nancy Pelosi to say the same thing — that they're not going to try to use the lame-duck session as a place to do things that otherwise would not pass," he said. "That type of thinking, that concern about ... cap-and-trade and other types of policies just feeds into this whole unpredictability issue, the issue of what's going to happen in Washington. We need to move away from that uncertainty."