Former President Clinton has been a better tool on the campaign trail for Democrats in Pennsylvania than President Obama has, Gov. Ed Rendell (D) said Monday.

Rendell — a staunch Clinton ally — explained that the 42nd president's usefulness on the campaign trail stems from his popularity among voters of all political stripes and the prosperity the nation enjoyed under his tutelage.

Asked on Fox News why "President Clinton was more effective in your state than Obama," Rendell replied "Oh, well because President Clinton has become a beloved figure even among independents and some Republicans. They think he did a great job, and when you look back in retrospect, the country has done terrific under President Clinton."

Rendell's comments come less than 24 hours before Election Day and after both Clinton and Obama spent much time in the Keystone State stumping for Democrats.

Last month, the president headlined two large rallies intended to motivate voters in the Democratic stronghold of Philadelphia, who in 2008 helped him win the state's 21 electoral votes and the presidency, to return to the polls this year.

But Obama has suffered from low approval ratings, especially among independent voters. In the final weeks of the campaign he largely stayed away from places where he is unpopular, save from his central Virginia stop for endangered Rep. Tom Perriello (D).  

Clinton, meanwhile, has crossed the state on behalf of Democratic candidates. He has headlined rallies for Senate nominee Rep. Joe Sestak, Rep. Paul Kanjorski, gubernatorial nominee Dan Onorato and John Callahan, the Democratic rival of Rep. Charlie Dent (R).

Obama also appeared for Sestak in September.

Sestak's race has been affected by controversial White House politics: Obama originally endorsed his opponent, Republican-turned-Democratic Sen. Arlen Specter and the White House admitted that President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonHouse Democrats risk overriding fairness factor on impeachment Senate GOP braces for impeachment trial 'roller coaster' What did the Founders most fear about impeachment? MORE was asked to offer Sestak an unpaid administration position in exchange for him getting out of the race.

Rendell said that Clinton is "a trooper. He gets out there, he's not on the ballot, this has nothing to do with him personally. People respect that very much."