GOP Sen.-elect Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulRon Paul hospitalized in Texas The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump previews SCOTUS nominee as 'totally brilliant' Rand Paul says he can't judge 'guilt or innocence' in Breonna Taylor case MORE said Monday that he wants to attach spending cuts to every major piece of legislation that comes before the Senate next year. 

Paul (Ky.) — who won his race with strong support from the Tea Party movement — said he will "pressure" Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidThe Supreme Court vacancy — yet another congressional food fight Trump seeks to turn around campaign with Supreme Court fight On The Trail: Battle over Ginsburg replacement threatens to break Senate MORE (D-Nev.) to take simple majority votes on spending cut amendments in the next Congress. 

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"I think that every piece of major legislation that goes forward from now on needs to have attached to it spending cuts," Paul said during a podcast with conservative blogger Ben Domenech. If Congress is serious about the nation's ballooning debt and deficits, Paul said, "We have to be serious and introduce spending cuts.

"That's one thing that I will do when I am there, is introduce it at every opportunity and we will have votes on it," he said. 

Many political observers have taken a keen interest in Paul to see if his priorities next year will clash with those of Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocratic senator to party: 'A little message discipline wouldn't kill us' House to vote on resolution affirming peaceful transition of power Republican lawyers brush off Trump's election comments MORE, who happens to be Kentucky's other senator. 

Some have suggested that new independent-minded GOP senators such as Paul and Utah's Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeBipartisan representatives demand answers on expired surveillance programs McConnell shores up GOP support for coronavirus package McConnell tries to unify GOP MORE could cause problems for McConnell, who largely held his conference in lockstep during the 111th Congress. McConnell originally endorsed Paul's primary opponent, Trey Grayson, but he eventually presented a united front with the son of libertarian Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) following his primary victory. 

Unlike GOP Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamLincoln Project mocks Lindsey Graham's fundraising lag with Sarah McLachlan-themed video The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Republicans lawmakers rebuke Trump on election Trump dumbfounds GOP with latest unforced error MORE (S.C.), who accused party members of "capitulation" for allowing Democrats to pass key legislation during the lame-duck session, Paul praised McConnell for leading the fight against the $1.1 trillion omnibus spending bill, which collapsed due to lack of support. 

"I'm encouraged by the stand on the omnibus bill, and I think that showed a united Republican front, essentially," Paul said.

The newly elected Kentuckian said that he wants to focus on big-picture items such as government reform and the size of government when he gets to Congress, and is unconcerned with getting his name on major pieces of legislation.

"I want to be part of the reform movement that the Tea Party is on a national stage. I'm not there and interested in passing one bill that has my name on it," he said. "I'm there and interested because I think government is broken and really needs serious reform."