GOP Sen.-elect Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulWatchdog calls for probe into Gohmert 'disregarding public health guidance' on COVID-19 Massie plans to donate plasma after testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies After trillions in tax cuts for the rich, Republicans refuse to help struggling Americans MORE said Monday that he wants to attach spending cuts to every major piece of legislation that comes before the Senate next year. 

Paul (Ky.) — who won his race with strong support from the Tea Party movement — said he will "pressure" Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidPentagon forming task force to investigate military UFO sightings Kamala Harris makes history — as a Westerner McConnell goes hands-off on coronavirus relief bill MORE (D-Nev.) to take simple majority votes on spending cut amendments in the next Congress. 

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"I think that every piece of major legislation that goes forward from now on needs to have attached to it spending cuts," Paul said during a podcast with conservative blogger Ben Domenech. If Congress is serious about the nation's ballooning debt and deficits, Paul said, "We have to be serious and introduce spending cuts.

"That's one thing that I will do when I am there, is introduce it at every opportunity and we will have votes on it," he said. 

Many political observers have taken a keen interest in Paul to see if his priorities next year will clash with those of Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Senate leaves until September without coronavirus relief agreement | Weekly jobless claims fall below 1 million for first time since March | Trump says no Post Office funding means Democrats 'can't have universal mail-in voting' Overnight Health Care: Senate leaves until September without coronavirus relief deal | US records deadliest day of summer | Georgia governor drops lawsuit over Atlanta's mask mandate Senate leaves until September without coronavirus relief deal MORE, who happens to be Kentucky's other senator. 

Some have suggested that new independent-minded GOP senators such as Paul and Utah's Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeDavis: The Hall of Shame for GOP senators who remain silent on Donald Trump Overnight Defense: Air Force general officially becomes first African American service chief | Senators introduce bill to block Trump armed drone sale measure | State Department's special envoy for Iran is departing the Trump administration Senators introduce bill to block Trump armed drone sale measure MORE could cause problems for McConnell, who largely held his conference in lockstep during the 111th Congress. McConnell originally endorsed Paul's primary opponent, Trey Grayson, but he eventually presented a united front with the son of libertarian Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) following his primary victory. 

Unlike GOP Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham says FBI chief 'committed to being helpful' after Trump criticism Democrat flips GOP-held state House seat in South Carolina Ron Johnson signals some GOP senators concerned about his Obama-era probes MORE (S.C.), who accused party members of "capitulation" for allowing Democrats to pass key legislation during the lame-duck session, Paul praised McConnell for leading the fight against the $1.1 trillion omnibus spending bill, which collapsed due to lack of support. 

"I'm encouraged by the stand on the omnibus bill, and I think that showed a united Republican front, essentially," Paul said.

The newly elected Kentuckian said that he wants to focus on big-picture items such as government reform and the size of government when he gets to Congress, and is unconcerned with getting his name on major pieces of legislation.

"I want to be part of the reform movement that the Tea Party is on a national stage. I'm not there and interested in passing one bill that has my name on it," he said. "I'm there and interested because I think government is broken and really needs serious reform."