Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell seeks to end feud with Trump Senate GOP signal they won't filibuster debate of hate crimes bill Colin Powell on Afghanistan: 'We've done all we can do' MORE (R-Ky.) does not have a Democratic colleague to sit with during Tuesday's State of the Union.

Asked on ”Fox News Sunday” whether he will sit at the Republican leadership table during President Obama's speech, he said, “I'm going to sit where I usually sit.”

"We don't have seating assignments for most of our members. They can sit anywhere they want to," he added.

“More important than the appearance of sitting together is what we do together. And the American people are more interested in actual accomplishments on a bipartisan basis here in the next six to nine months than they are with the seating arrangement at the State of the Union,” he said.


Instead of sitting by party, many Democrats and Republicans have been pairing this year to show a spirit of bipartisanship after the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) two weeks ago.

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Appearing on the same program, Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinSchumer warns Democrats can't let GOP block expansive agenda Holder, Yates lead letter backing Biden pick for Civil Rights Division at DOJ Biden's gun control push poses danger for midterms MORE (D-Ill.) confirmed he will sit with Sen. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkDuckworth announces reelection bid Brave new world: Why we need a Senate Human Rights Commission  Senate majority battle snags Biden Cabinet hopefuls MORE (R-Ill.) during the State of the Union.

On ABC's “This Week,” Sens. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) and Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) said they did not have “dates” yet for the State of the Union.

On the program, Sen. Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) asked Hutchison if she would like to sit next to him. Her response was not broadcast on the show. 

On CBS' "Face the Nation," Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump knocks CNN for 'completely false' report Gaetz was denied meeting The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - Biden, lawmakers start down a road with infrastructure Sylvester Stallone reportedly joins Trump's Mar-a-Lago MORE (R-Ariz.) said he's going to sit with Sen. Tom UdallTom UdallOregon senator takes center stage in Democratic filibuster debate Bipartisan bill seeks to raise fees for public lands drilling OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Haaland courts moderates during tense confirmation hearing | GOP's Westerman looks to take on Democrats on climate change | White House urges passage of House public lands package MORE (D-N.M.), while Sen. Mark UdallMark Emery UdallKennedy apologizes for calling Haaland a 'whack job' OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Haaland courts moderates during tense confirmation hearing | GOP's Westerman looks to take on Democrats on climate change | White House urges passage of House public lands package Udalls: Haaland criticism motivated 'by something other than her record' MORE (D-Colo.), who came up with the mixed-seating idea and circulated a pledge among his colleagues, sits in McCain's usual seat.

"The fact is it's a good thing to do," McCain said. "Why not?"

Later on Sunday, Sen. Charles GrassleyChuck GrassleyHolder, Yates lead letter backing Biden pick for Civil Rights Division at DOJ Number of migrants detained at southern border reaches 15-year high: reports Grassley, Cornyn push for Senate border hearing MORE (R-IA) tweeted that his "date" to the State of the Union will be Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenIRS chief warns of unpaid taxes hitting trillion The first Southern state legalizes marijuana — what it means nationally A bold fix for US international taxation of corporations MORE (R-Ore.). Grassley noted that he was worked with Wyden to try to end the practice of secret Senate holds on nominations and legislation. "He invited," Grassley wrote.


Bridget Johnson contributed to this post. Post was updated at 2:27 pm.