Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellObama: Filibuster makes it 'almost impossible' to govern Ethics panel calls on House, Senate leaders to act on anti-sexual harassment bill Don’t fret the lame duck MORE (R-Ky.) does not have a Democratic colleague to sit with during Tuesday's State of the Union.

Asked on ”Fox News Sunday” whether he will sit at the Republican leadership table during President Obama's speech, he said, “I'm going to sit where I usually sit.”

"We don't have seating assignments for most of our members. They can sit anywhere they want to," he added.

“More important than the appearance of sitting together is what we do together. And the American people are more interested in actual accomplishments on a bipartisan basis here in the next six to nine months than they are with the seating arrangement at the State of the Union,” he said.


Instead of sitting by party, many Democrats and Republicans have been pairing this year to show a spirit of bipartisanship after the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) two weeks ago.

Appearing on the same program, Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDrug industry nervous about Grassley’s new role Multiple deaths in shooting at Chicago hospital Senate barrels toward showdown over Trump's court picks MORE (D-Ill.) confirmed he will sit with Sen. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkDems vow swift action on gun reform next year This week: Trump heads to Capitol Hill Trump attending Senate GOP lunch Tuesday MORE (R-Ill.) during the State of the Union.

On ABC's “This Week,” Sens. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) and Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) said they did not have “dates” yet for the State of the Union.

On the program, Sen. Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) asked Hutchison if she would like to sit next to him. Her response was not broadcast on the show. 

On CBS' "Face the Nation," Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainJoy Behar torches Ivanka Trump over emails: 'How dumb' can she be? Stephen King calls Trump a 'chickens---' Trump stokes new unlikely feud MORE (R-Ariz.) said he's going to sit with Sen. Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallWarren, 2020 Dems target private immigration detention center operators Hillicon Valley: Trump eyes staff shake-up | Amazon taps NYC, Northern Virginia for new offices | What it will mean for DC | Tech firms buck Trump on cyber pact | Defense official warns against hacking back Dem senators pressure FTC to investigate deceptive internet marketing to children MORE (D-N.M.), while Sen. Mark UdallMark Emery UdallTrump calls Kavanaugh accusations ‘totally political’ Record number of LGBT candidates running for governor Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation MORE (D-Colo.), who came up with the mixed-seating idea and circulated a pledge among his colleagues, sits in McCain's usual seat.

"The fact is it's a good thing to do," McCain said. "Why not?"

Later on Sunday, Sen. Charles GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOvernight Health Care: Drug industry nervous about Grassley | CDC warns public not to eat romaine lettuce | Sanders unveils new drug pricing bill The Hill's Morning Report — Are Pelosi’s Democratic detractors going too far? Divisions in GOP may leave Trump priority in Senate limbo MORE (R-IA) tweeted that his "date" to the State of the Union will be Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee Wyden2020 Democrats challenge Trump's use of troops at Mexico border Dems slam Trump for siding with Saudi Arabia in Khashoggi killing Dem senator demands public intelligence assessment on Khashoggi killing MORE (R-Ore.). Grassley noted that he was worked with Wyden to try to end the practice of secret Senate holds on nominations and legislation. "He invited," Grassley wrote.


Bridget Johnson contributed to this post. Post was updated at 2:27 pm.