Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Actor John Krasinski films outside White House Biden's Supreme Court choice: A political promise, but also a matter of justice Let's 'reimagine' political corruption MORE (R-Ky.) does not have a Democratic colleague to sit with during Tuesday's State of the Union.

Asked on ”Fox News Sunday” whether he will sit at the Republican leadership table during President Obama's speech, he said, “I'm going to sit where I usually sit.”

"We don't have seating assignments for most of our members. They can sit anywhere they want to," he added.

“More important than the appearance of sitting together is what we do together. And the American people are more interested in actual accomplishments on a bipartisan basis here in the next six to nine months than they are with the seating arrangement at the State of the Union,” he said.


Instead of sitting by party, many Democrats and Republicans have been pairing this year to show a spirit of bipartisanship after the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) two weeks ago.

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Appearing on the same program, Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinSchumer finds unity moment in Supreme Court fight Schumer vows to vote on Biden Supreme Court pick with 'all deliberate speed' Bipartisan Senate group discusses changes to election law MORE (D-Ill.) confirmed he will sit with Sen. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkBiden's relationship with 'Joe-Joe' Manchin hits the rocks Let's fix America's accounting problem — starting with Build Back Better Duckworth announces reelection bid MORE (R-Ill.) during the State of the Union.

On ABC's “This Week,” Sens. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) and Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) said they did not have “dates” yet for the State of the Union.

On the program, Sen. Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) asked Hutchison if she would like to sit next to him. Her response was not broadcast on the show. 

On CBS' "Face the Nation," Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainBiden seeks to ward off second Ukraine-Russia fight Voto Latino CEO: Sinema will have a 'very difficult pathway' in 2024 reelection Meghan McCain rips 'selfish' Sarah Palin for dining out despite COVID-19 diagnosis MORE (R-Ariz.) said he's going to sit with Sen. Tom UdallTom UdallCruz to get Nord Stream 2 vote as part of deal on Biden nominees Democrats threaten to play hardball over Cruz's blockade Rubio vows to slow-walk Biden's China, Spain ambassador nominees MORE (D-N.M.), while Sen. Mark UdallMark Emery Udall11 former Democratic senators call for 'meaningful reform to Senate rules' Kennedy apologizes for calling Haaland a 'whack job' OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Haaland courts moderates during tense confirmation hearing | GOP's Westerman looks to take on Democrats on climate change | White House urges passage of House public lands package MORE (D-Colo.), who came up with the mixed-seating idea and circulated a pledge among his colleagues, sits in McCain's usual seat.

"The fact is it's a good thing to do," McCain said. "Why not?"

Later on Sunday, Sen. Charles GrassleyChuck GrassleySenate Republicans press federal authorities for information on Texas synagogue hostage-taker Small ranchers say Biden letting them get squeezed These Senate seats are up for election in 2022 MORE (R-IA) tweeted that his "date" to the State of the Union will be Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenTop Biden official says information classification system undermines national security, public trust Senate Democrats urge Biden to get beefed-up child tax credit into spending deal Overnight Energy & Environment — High court will hear case on water rule MORE (R-Ore.). Grassley noted that he was worked with Wyden to try to end the practice of secret Senate holds on nominations and legislation. "He invited," Grassley wrote.


Bridget Johnson contributed to this post. Post was updated at 2:27 pm.