Freshman Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioHillicon Valley: FTC reportedly settles with Facebook for B fine | Trump calls to regulate Facebook's crypto project | Court rules Pentagon can award B 'war cloud' contract | Study shows automation will hit rural areas hardest Court rules Pentagon can award B 'war cloud' contract later this summer Rubio asks White House to delay B Pentagon contract over Amazon concerns   MORE (R-Fla.) was elected with strong Tea Party support, but he is not sure that forming a Senate Tea Party Caucus is a good idea.

Rubio is not expected to attend the group's first meeting on Jan. 27, but he went further in a recent interview, saying that the caucus could co-opt the grassroots conservative movement. 

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"My concern is that politicians all of a sudden start co-opting the mantle of Tea Party. If all of a sudden being in the Tea Party is not something that is happening in Main Street, but rather something that’s happening in Washington D.C.," he said in an interview with the Shark Tank, a Florida political website. "The Tea Party all of a sudden becomes some sort of movement run by politicians. It’s gonna lose its effectiveness and I’m concerned about that."

Even though the Tea Party movement had a tremendous affect on Senate GOP primary races around the country, the Capitol Hill group has only three members committed to attending its first meeting: Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeFairness for High Skilled Immigrants Act exposes Silicon Valley's hollow diversity slogans Overnight Defense: Senate rejects effort to restrict Trump on Iran | Democrats at debate vow to shore up NATO | Senate confirms chief of Space Command Senate sets new voting record with Iran war measure MORE (R-Utah), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulTrump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand Lawyer: Flynn will keep cooperating after co-conspirator revelations Fairness for High Skilled Immigrants Act exposes Silicon Valley's hollow diversity slogans MORE (R-Ky.) and Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) 

Other senators elected with the help of Tea Party activists, such as Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonEx-Wisconsin governor Scott Walker takes job as president of conservative group, won't seek office soon Democratic Senate hopes hinge on Trump tide GOP senator presses Instagram, Facebook over alleged bias in content recommendations MORE (R-Wis.) and Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) have also declined to join the caucus.

Rep. Michele BachmannMichele Marie BachmannKlobuchar urges CNN town hall audience: 'That's when you guys are supposed to cheer, OK?' Michele Bachmann praises Trump: Americans will 'never see a more godly, biblical president' Will Biden lead a 'return to normalcy' in 2020? MORE (R-Minn.) last year created a Tea Party Caucus in the House, which had nearly 30 members at the end of 2010.

But membership in the group might not become a litmus test for Republican lawmakers. Some conservative bloggers have echoed Rubio's concern about the caucus.

"When Representative Michele Bachmann spearheaded the Tea Party Caucus in the House, I had mixed emotions. When one person or a group of people claim to represent ideas, then the whole movement can be tainted by the missteps of the individual," Melissa Clouthier wrote at the conservative blog RedState in a post about Rubio's membership.

Rubio was an early underdog in the Florida Republican Senate primary behind Gov. Charlie Crist. But he eventually picked up momentum with the help of the Tea Party and drove Crist out of the race, and later the GOP. Rubio defeated Crist, who ran as an Independent, and Rep. Kendrick Meek (D) in the general election.

The Florida senator and conservative favorite said he would be joining the Senate Steering Committee, an existing group of conservative senators. 

"Why do we need something in addition to the steering committee?" Rubio asked. "And there maybe a good reason. I'm curious to hear about that."

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h/t Senatus