Freshman Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioHillicon Valley: Trump takes flak for not joining anti-extremism pact | Phone carriers largely end sharing of location data | Huawei pushes back on ban | Florida lawmakers demand to learn counties hacked by Russians | Feds bust 0M cybercrime group Huawei says inclusion on US trade blacklist is in 'no one's interest' Frustrated GOP senators want answers from Trump on Iran MORE (R-Fla.) was elected with strong Tea Party support, but he is not sure that forming a Senate Tea Party Caucus is a good idea.

Rubio is not expected to attend the group's first meeting on Jan. 27, but he went further in a recent interview, saying that the caucus could co-opt the grassroots conservative movement. 

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"My concern is that politicians all of a sudden start co-opting the mantle of Tea Party. If all of a sudden being in the Tea Party is not something that is happening in Main Street, but rather something that’s happening in Washington D.C.," he said in an interview with the Shark Tank, a Florida political website. "The Tea Party all of a sudden becomes some sort of movement run by politicians. It’s gonna lose its effectiveness and I’m concerned about that."

Even though the Tea Party movement had a tremendous affect on Senate GOP primary races around the country, the Capitol Hill group has only three members committed to attending its first meeting: Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeFrustrated GOP senators want answers from Trump on Iran Congress can expand paid leave and help workers save with bipartisan support Export-Import Bank back to full strength after Senate confirmations MORE (R-Utah), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulUS ambassador to Germany ruffles State Department with budget stand Overnight Defense: Congressional leaders receive classified briefing on Iran | Trump on war: 'I hope not' | Key Republican calls threats credible | Warren plan targets corporate influence at Pentagon Rand Paul: Bolton is a 'malign influence' MORE (R-Ky.) and Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) 

Other senators elected with the help of Tea Party activists, such as Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonBarr throws curveball into Senate GOP 'spying' probe Bipartisan group of senators introduce legislation designed to strengthen cybersecurity of voting systems Trump Jr. subpoena spotlights GOP split over Russia probes MORE (R-Wis.) and Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) have also declined to join the caucus.

Rep. Michele BachmannMichele Marie BachmannKlobuchar urges CNN town hall audience: 'That's when you guys are supposed to cheer, OK?' Michele Bachmann praises Trump: Americans will 'never see a more godly, biblical president' Will Biden lead a 'return to normalcy' in 2020? MORE (R-Minn.) last year created a Tea Party Caucus in the House, which had nearly 30 members at the end of 2010.

But membership in the group might not become a litmus test for Republican lawmakers. Some conservative bloggers have echoed Rubio's concern about the caucus.

"When Representative Michele Bachmann spearheaded the Tea Party Caucus in the House, I had mixed emotions. When one person or a group of people claim to represent ideas, then the whole movement can be tainted by the missteps of the individual," Melissa Clouthier wrote at the conservative blog RedState in a post about Rubio's membership.

Rubio was an early underdog in the Florida Republican Senate primary behind Gov. Charlie Crist. But he eventually picked up momentum with the help of the Tea Party and drove Crist out of the race, and later the GOP. Rubio defeated Crist, who ran as an Independent, and Rep. Kendrick Meek (D) in the general election.

The Florida senator and conservative favorite said he would be joining the Senate Steering Committee, an existing group of conservative senators. 

"Why do we need something in addition to the steering committee?" Rubio asked. "And there maybe a good reason. I'm curious to hear about that."

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h/t Senatus