If President Obama should invoke a clause in the 14th Amendment in order to bypass Congress and borrow beyond the debt limit, at least one conservative Republican lawmaker would consider that an act worthy of impeachment.

Speaking at a Tea Party event in a suburb of Charleston, S.C., Rep. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottGOP senators unveil bill to expand 'opportunity zone' reporting requirements McConnell, Grassley at odds over Trump-backed drug bill Senate passes bipartisan bill to permanently fund historically black colleges MORE (R-S.C.) said it would be an "impeachable act" for the president to find a way around Congressional authority to raise the debt ceiling.

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"I think we find ourselves in the biggest war of all time if he does that, if he even tries to do that," Scott said in a video posted at the local news website West Ashley Patch.

The idea that the 14th Amendment may provide a constitutional bypass to the standoff in Congress over the debt ceiling picked up steam this week. Some analysts have suggested that the amendment makes it illegal for the United States to default on its debt, giving the president the power to extend the Treasury Department's borrowing authority without congressional approval.

The amendment reads, in part, that “the validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by law ... shall not be questioned.”

Obama sidestepped a question on the so-called "14th Amendment solution" at the White House Twitter town hall held Wednesday. “I don’t think we should even get to the constitutional issue,” Obama said.

Responding to a question from an audience member at the Tea Party meeting, Scott called the idea "silly" but added that "there is a tad bit of truth to it."

Scott said, "This president is looking to usurp congressional oversight to find a way to get it done without us."

Republicans including Sen. John CornynJohn CornynHillicon Valley: FTC rules Cambridge Analytica engaged in 'deceptive practices' | NATO researchers warn social media failing to remove fake accounts | Sanders calls for breaking up Comcast, Verizon Bipartisan senators call on FERC to protect against Huawei threats Giffords, Demand Justice to pressure GOP senators to reject Trump judicial pick MORE (R-Texas) and Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsThe shifting impeachment positions of Jonathan Turley Rosenstein, Sessions discussed firing Comey in late 2016 or early 2017: FBI notes Justice Dept releases another round of summaries from Mueller probe MORE (R-Ala.) have brushed off the legitimacy of a 14th Amendment solution. However, Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOvernight Health Care — Presented by Johnson & Johnson – House progressives may try to block vote on Pelosi drug bill | McConnell, Grassley at odds over Trump-backed drug pricing bill | Lawmakers close to deal on surprise medical bills GOP senators request interview with former DNC contractor to probe possible Ukraine ties Congressional leaders unite to fight for better future for America's children and families MORE (R-Iowa) raised the idea on Wednesday as one possible solution to the current impasse in deficit negotiations if deadline pressure alone cannot force action by the Treasury's Aug. 2 deadline.

“People are looking at the fact that maybe the debt ceiling bill that Congress presumably has to pass for the government to borrow more maybe is contrary to that constitutional provision,” Grassley said, as reported by the Iowa Quad-City Times.

Scott characterized the possibility as "catastrophic ... if one man can usurp the entire system set up by our Founding Fathers over something this significant."