If President Obama should invoke a clause in the 14th Amendment in order to bypass Congress and borrow beyond the debt limit, at least one conservative Republican lawmaker would consider that an act worthy of impeachment.

Speaking at a Tea Party event in a suburb of Charleston, S.C., Rep. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottDemocrats lead in diversity in new Congress despite GOP gains The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Capital One - Pfizer unveils detailed analysis of COVID-19 vaccine & next steps GOP senators congratulate Harris on Senate floor MORE (R-S.C.) said it would be an "impeachable act" for the president to find a way around Congressional authority to raise the debt ceiling.

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"I think we find ourselves in the biggest war of all time if he does that, if he even tries to do that," Scott said in a video posted at the local news website West Ashley Patch.

The idea that the 14th Amendment may provide a constitutional bypass to the standoff in Congress over the debt ceiling picked up steam this week. Some analysts have suggested that the amendment makes it illegal for the United States to default on its debt, giving the president the power to extend the Treasury Department's borrowing authority without congressional approval.

The amendment reads, in part, that “the validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by law ... shall not be questioned.”

Obama sidestepped a question on the so-called "14th Amendment solution" at the White House Twitter town hall held Wednesday. “I don’t think we should even get to the constitutional issue,” Obama said.

Responding to a question from an audience member at the Tea Party meeting, Scott called the idea "silly" but added that "there is a tad bit of truth to it."

Scott said, "This president is looking to usurp congressional oversight to find a way to get it done without us."

Republicans including Sen. John CornynJohn CornynCornyn says election outcome 'becoming increasingly clear': report Top GOP senator: Biden should be getting intel briefings GOP senator congratulates Biden, says Trump should accept results MORE (R-Texas) and Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsAlabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future Tuberville incorrectly says Gore was president-elect in 2000 Next attorney general must embrace marijuana law reforms MORE (R-Ala.) have brushed off the legitimacy of a 14th Amendment solution. However, Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyRep. Rick Allen tests positive for COVID-19 On The Money: Biden to nominate Yellen for Treasury secretary | 'COVID cliff' looms | Democrats face pressure to back smaller stimulus Loeffler to continue to self-isolate after conflicting COVID-19 test results MORE (R-Iowa) raised the idea on Wednesday as one possible solution to the current impasse in deficit negotiations if deadline pressure alone cannot force action by the Treasury's Aug. 2 deadline.

“People are looking at the fact that maybe the debt ceiling bill that Congress presumably has to pass for the government to borrow more maybe is contrary to that constitutional provision,” Grassley said, as reported by the Iowa Quad-City Times.

Scott characterized the possibility as "catastrophic ... if one man can usurp the entire system set up by our Founding Fathers over something this significant."