Iraq to steal Sunday show spotlight
© Getty Images

President Obama’s decision to authorize airstrikes in Iraq this week, more than two years after U.S. forces left the country, is likely to dominate the Sunday shows this week. 

Obama declined on Saturday to give a timetable for how long the new U.S. operations would last, but made clear that American efforts could last awhile.

ADVERTISEMENT
"I don't think we are going to solve this problem in weeks," Obama said. "I think this is going to take some time."

Obama’s comments came as the U.S. also intensified its efforts to get humanitarian assistance to Iraqis trapped on a mountain in the country.

The president added Saturday that the Iraqi government and military would also need to bolster its efforts to fight back against Islamic militants, and pushed back on the idea that the withdrawal of U.S. troops caused the current situation.

Democrats have generally backed the president’s efforts, but some liberals are concerned that the escalation could lead to the return of ground troops – something Obama has vigorously denied would happen. Republicans have accused the president of not having a long-term strategy in Iraq and other foreign policy hotspots.

Here's the lineup:

ABC’s “This Week”: Carter Ham, a retired Army general and former commander of U.S. troops in Mosul, will discuss America’s return to combat operations in Iraq.

Dr. Frank Glover, who has worked in Africa with the Christian missionary group SIM, and Robin Sanders, the former U.S. ambassador to the Congo and Nigeria, will join the show to discuss the recent Ebola outbreak.

The show’s roundtable includes Matthew Dowd and Cokie Roberts, both of ABC, LZ Granderson of ESPN and Sharyl Attkisson, formerly of CBS.

CBS’s “Face the Nation”: Iraq takes center stage here as well, with Sen. Jack ReedJack ReedDems push for more action on power grid cybersecurity 3 tips for President Trump before he outsources his duties to Mattis McCain threatens to block Trump's deputy Defense nominee MORE (D-R.I.), a member of the Armed Services Committee and a backer of the president’s recent decision to order airstrikes discussing that decision. James Jeffrey, a former ambassador to Iraq under Obama, will also talk about the administration’s efforts there.

On Ebola, Dr. Keiji Fukuda, a top World Health Organization official, will speak about the international response to the outbreak and his group’s announcement that Ebola amounts to a global health emergency. 

Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein will also chat about their role in the resignation of President Richard Nixon, which happened four decades ago this week.

"Fox News Sunday": A pair of lawmakers on opposite sides of the Iraq debate, Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamSenate panel questions Lynch on alleged FBI interference The Hill's Whip List: Senate ObamaCare repeal bill Judiciary Committee to continue Russia probe after Mueller meeting MORE (R-S.C.) and Ben CardinBen CardinDem senators urged Obama to take action on Russia before election Overnight Cybersecurity: Trump tweetstorm on Russia probe | White House reportedly pushing to weaken sanctions bill | Podesta to testify before House Intel Senate expected to pass Russia sanctions bill for a second time MORE (D-Md.), will likely respond to the president’s comments that keeping troops in the country would have helped.

Sen. Chris CoonsChris CoonsOvernight Regulation: Labor groups fear rollback of Obama worker protection rule | Trump regs czar advances in Senate | New FCC enforcement chief Overnight Tech: Uber CEO resigns | Trump's Iowa tech trip | Dems push Sessions to block AT&T-Time Warner deal | Lawmakers warned on threat to election systems | Senate Dem offers patent reform bill MORE (D-Del.) and John Engler, the chief executive of the Business Roundtable and a former Michigan governor, will debate the rash of recent corporate “inversions,” in which U.S. companies reincorporate abroad, and the Democratic proposals to stop the practice.

National Journal’s Ron Fournier, the conservative radio host Laura Ingraham, The Washington Post’s Jackie Kucinich and the conservative columnist George Will make up the roundtable. 

CNN’s “State of the Union”: Sen. John McCainJohn McCainFrustrated Dems say Obama botched Russia response Coats: Trump seemed obsessed with Russia probe The Hill's Whip List: Senate ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (R-Ariz.), a frequent critic of Obama’s foreign policy, will lay out how he thinks the president has missed the mark on Iraq.

Retired Gen. James Jones, the president’s first national security adviser, and Zalmay Khalilzad, an ambassador to Iraq under George W. Bush, will discuss the escalation there as well.

Joe Lockhart, a former White House press secretary, and two veteran journalists, Ann Compton and Al Hunt, will remember James Brady, the former White House press secretary who died more than 30 years after being shot in an assassination attempt against President Ronald Reagan.

NBC's "Meet the Press": Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinSunday shows preview: Senate healthcare debate heats up Dems push for more action on power grid cybersecurity Live coverage: Senate GOP unveils its ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (D-Ill.) and Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.) join another show expected to concentrate on Iraq.

Two roundtables are also expected – one on foreign policy, with The Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg, Robin Wright of the Woodrow Wilson Center and Michael Leiter, the former director of the National Counterterrorism Center.

The political roundtable features Rep. Donna Edwards (D-Md.), Rich Lowry of the National Review and Chuck Todd and Andrea Mitchell, both of NBC News.

NPR’s “Weekend Edition Sunday”: Former Sen. George Mitchell (D-Maine), a former special envoy to the Middle East, and Major Gen. David Allvin of the Air Force discuss the foreign policy landscape as well.