House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerHouston Chronicle endorses Beto O'Rourke in Texas Senate race The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Citi — House postpones Rosenstein meeting | Trump hits Dems over Medicare for all | Hurricane Michael nears landfall Kavanaugh becomes new flashpoint in midterms defined by anger MORE (R-Ohio) said Sunday supported legislation to punish individuals who renounced their citizenship in order to avoid paying U.S. taxes, but said such measures were already law.

"There's already a law in the books," BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerHouston Chronicle endorses Beto O'Rourke in Texas Senate race The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Citi — House postpones Rosenstein meeting | Trump hits Dems over Medicare for all | Hurricane Michael nears landfall Kavanaugh becomes new flashpoint in midterms defined by anger MORE told ABC's George Stephanopoulos in an interview on ABC's "This Week." "It's already against the law."

Democratic Sens. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Health care a top policy message in fall campaigns McConnell says deficits 'not a Republican problem' Medicare for All is disastrous for American seniors and taxpayers MORE (N.Y.) and Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyDems target small cluster of states in battle for House Overnight Health Care — Presented by Purdue Pharma — Trump officials move to require drug prices in TV ads | 4,000 more people lose Medicaid in Arkansas | New top official for Medicaid Election Countdown: Cruz, O'Rourke fight at pivotal point | Ryan hitting the trail for vulnerable Republicans | Poll shows Biden leading Dem 2020 field | Arizona Senate debate tonight MORE Jr. (Pa.) announced legislation last week designed to punish people who renounce their citizenship in order to dodge taxes. 

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Their bill, the Ex-Patriot Act, is a direct response to Eduardo Saverin, the co-founder of Facebook, who renounced his U.S. citizenship last year, and the senators had harsh words for what they called Saverin's "scheme" to avoid paying taxes on his interest in the company, which went public last week. 

Saverin's move saved him an estimated $67 million to $100 million in taxes. The wealthy technology investor however has said his change in citizenship was not an effort to avoid American taxes.

Boehner on Sunday said it is "absolutely outrageous" for anyone to renounce their citizenship in order to avoid taxes.

The Casey and Schumer legislation would punish any individual who renounces their citizenship and holds a net worth of $2 million or an average income tax liability of $148,000 over the last five years.

If the Internal Revenue Service determines that person gave up their passport for primarily tax reasons, the person's U.S. assets would be taxed at 30 percent and they would be barred from ever re-entering the United States.

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchGOP leaders hesitant to challenge Trump on Saudi Arabia Congress should work with Trump and not 'cowboy' on Saudi Arabia, says GOP senator US to open trade talks with Japan, EU, UK MORE (R-Utah), the ranking member of the Senate Finance Committee, said his Democratic colleagues were overlooking the "root cause" of Saverin's actions. A spokesperson from his office released a statement last week saying that wealthy expatriates seeking to renounce their American citizenship is a sign that the tax code needs to be fixed.