House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBiden's relationship with top House Republican is frosty Maher chides Democrats: We 'suck the fun out of everything' Budowsky: Liz Cheney vs. conservatives in name only MORE (R-Ohio) said Sunday supported legislation to punish individuals who renounced their citizenship in order to avoid paying U.S. taxes, but said such measures were already law.

"There's already a law in the books," BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBiden's relationship with top House Republican is frosty Maher chides Democrats: We 'suck the fun out of everything' Budowsky: Liz Cheney vs. conservatives in name only MORE told ABC's George Stephanopoulos in an interview on ABC's "This Week." "It's already against the law."

Democratic Sens. Charles SchumerChuck SchumerHouse conservatives take aim at Schumer-led bipartisan China bill There will be no new immigration law under Biden, unless he changes course This week: Congressional leaders to meet with Biden amid GOP reckoning MORE (N.Y.) and Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyA historic moment to truly honor mothers Democrats face big headaches on Biden's T spending plan The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - GOP makes infrastructure play; Senate passes Asian hate crimes bill MORE Jr. (Pa.) announced legislation last week designed to punish people who renounce their citizenship in order to dodge taxes. 

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Their bill, the Ex-Patriot Act, is a direct response to Eduardo Saverin, the co-founder of Facebook, who renounced his U.S. citizenship last year, and the senators had harsh words for what they called Saverin's "scheme" to avoid paying taxes on his interest in the company, which went public last week. 

Saverin's move saved him an estimated $67 million to $100 million in taxes. The wealthy technology investor however has said his change in citizenship was not an effort to avoid American taxes.

Boehner on Sunday said it is "absolutely outrageous" for anyone to renounce their citizenship in order to avoid taxes.

The Casey and Schumer legislation would punish any individual who renounces their citizenship and holds a net worth of $2 million or an average income tax liability of $148,000 over the last five years.

If the Internal Revenue Service determines that person gave up their passport for primarily tax reasons, the person's U.S. assets would be taxed at 30 percent and they would be barred from ever re-entering the United States.

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchBottom line The Republicans' deep dive into nativism Press: Forget bipartisanship — it's dead! MORE (R-Utah), the ranking member of the Senate Finance Committee, said his Democratic colleagues were overlooking the "root cause" of Saverin's actions. A spokesperson from his office released a statement last week saying that wealthy expatriates seeking to renounce their American citizenship is a sign that the tax code needs to be fixed.