Bill Clinton to continue Georgetown lectures next week
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Former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonPresident Trump’s job approval rating continues to hold steady in latest Hill.TV poll Cybersecurity for national defense: How many 'wake-up calls' does it take? Who's in control alters our opinion of how things are MORE will speak at Georgetown University on Tuesday, one of his first public appearances since his wife, former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMueller's team asking Manafort about Roger Stone: report O'Rourke targets Cruz with several attack ads a day after debate GOP pollster says polls didn't pick up on movement in week before 2016 election MORE, announced her presidential campaign.

He will deliver the third in a series of four lectures at Georgetown, his alma mater, on Tuesday morning. The lectures are delivered over the course of a few years, according to the university.

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“The lectures examine the framework for a lifetime spent championing an idea espoused by his Georgetown professor Carroll Quigley: that America is the greatest nation in history because our people have always believed in two things — that tomorrow can be better than today and that every one of us has a personal, moral responsibility to make it so,” the university said on its website.

Clinton graduated from the Washington university’s School of Foreign Service in 1970.

After her announcement last Sunday, Hillary Clinton embarked on a swing through Iowa to meet with voters. Bill Clinton did not accompany her.

When he is speaking at Georgetown, she will be in New Hampshire.

The former president did speak at an event for a foundation supporting ovarian cancer research on Tuesday, but did not talk about his wife's campaign for the Democratic nomination.

The Clinton campaign has reportedly grappled with how to include the former president.

"I think it's important, and Hillary does too, that she go out there as if she's never run for anything before and establish her connection with the voters," he told Town & Country this month. "And that my role should primarily be as a backstage adviser to her until we get much, much closer to the election."