Rand Paul to livestream an entire day in Iowa
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Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulMichigan Republican isolating after positive coronavirus test GOP Rep. Mike Bost tests positive for COVID-19 Top Democrats introduce resolution calling for mask mandate, testing program in Senate MORE (R-Ky.) plans on Tuesday to livestream his entire day on the presidential campaign trail.

“Tomorrow I am excited to bring my message of liberty to the country as the first Pres. candidate to live stream an entire day,” the GOP White House hopeful tweeted.

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Paul is promoting the event on Twitter and other social media platforms with the hash tag #RandLive.

“It will be the Rand Paul campaign’s version of ‘The Truman Show’ or ‘EdTV’,” said Vincent Harris, Paul’s chief digital strategist, according to Rare. “The campaign will stream every event and give unprecedented behind the scenes access to Senator Paul and what life is like on the trail in our nation’s first state to vote.” 

“We’re very excited about the ability to reach voters, especially younger voters who have come to expect this kind of digital interaction from their candidates,” Harris added.

Paul’s campaign is offering its livestream through its Facebook and UStream.tv pages, Rare reported.

It said that users who have “liked” the Kentucky lawmaker’s official Facebook page would get a notification when he starts broadcasting.

Paul plans on showing how his campaign organization runs and how it interacts with supporters on the campaign trail.

He is also offering live commentary on the first televised Democratic presidential debate airing live from Las Vegas late Tuesday.

“Our campaign has always believed in engaging the maximum amount of voters from across the nation,” said Sergio Gor, a Paul spokesman, according to Mashable.

“Not only are we engaged on every social platform from Snapchat to Facebook and from Periscope to Vine, we want to offer an embedded experience to those who wonder what happens throughout the day,” he added.

Paul has repeatedly courted younger, tech-savvy voters like college students during his 2016 Oval Office bid thus far.

He is currently struggling for traction amid one of the most crowded GOP presidential fields in recent memory, ranking eighth out of 15 Republican candidates with 2.6 percent, according to the latest RealClearPolitics average of samplings