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Clinton is the runaway favorite among Democrats, with 57 percent saying they want her as the party's nominee. Vice President Biden comes in a distant second at 16 percent, followed by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenSchumer vows to advance two-pronged infrastructure plan next month Overnight Health Care: CDC panel meets on vaccines and heart inflammation | Health officials emphasize vaccine is safe | Judge rules Missouri doesn't have to implement Medicaid expansion Democrats urge Biden to extend moratorium on student loan payments MORE (D-Mass.) at 4 percent each. Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley pulls 3 percent support among party supporters, with Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerBiden at Sen. John Warner's funeral: He 'gave me confidence' White House advisers huddle with Senate moderates on infrastructure Biden risks break with progressives on infrastructure MORE (D-Va.) each at 2, and Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandOvernight Defense: Joint Chiefs chairman clashes with GOP on critical race theory | House bill introduced to overhaul military justice system as sexual assault reform builds momentum House lawmakers introduce bill to overhaul military justice system Pentagon chief backs change to military sexual assault prosecution MORE (D-N.Y.) and Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer winning 1 percent each.

Clinton is retiring from her position in President Obama's Cabinet, and has tried to temper expectations that she'd be open to running in 2016. However, after failing to gain the nomination in 2008, her performance as secretary of State has boosted her profile, and many in both parties believe she would be a formidable presidential candidate.

In December, former Speaker and presidential candidate Newt Gingrich (R) said the Republican Party in its current form was “incapable” of beating her if she's the Democratic nominee in 2016.

On the Republican side, the field is far more competitive. Rubio leads with 21 percent support, followed by former vice presidential candidate Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanTrump clash ahead: Ron DeSantis positions himself as GOP's future in a direct-mail piece Cutting critical family support won't solve the labor crisis Juan Williams: Trump's GOP descends into farce MORE (R-Wis.) at 16. Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee holds 15 percent support, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush tied at 14, Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulPoll: 58 percent say Fauci should not resign Fauci says he puts 'very little weight in the craziness of condemning me' Senate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior MORE (R-Ky.) at 5, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal at 3, and Govs. Rick Perry (Texas) and Susana Martinez (New Mexico) each taking 2.

Rubio's recent schedule — a stop in Iowa, the first caucus state, and a high-profile interview with GQ magazine — has many Republicans hopeful that he's gearing up for a run.

However, Clinton trounces Rubio, Ryan and Bush in head to head match-ups, according to the early PPP survey, besting each by 14 percentage points.

The most competitive Republican against Clinton right now is Christie, according to the poll, who trails Clinton 44 to 42.

But Christie has infuriated some on the right recently after praising Obama for the federal response to Hurricane Sandy in the final days of the 2012 campaign, and then bashing congressional Republicans after Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerAre maskless House members scofflaws? Israel, Democrats and the problem of the Middle East Joe Crowley to register as lobbyist for recording artists MORE (R-Ohio) pulled a vote on a bill to provide aid to victims of the storm.

Christie's favorability with Republican voters is among the lowest of any of the candidates at 44 positive and 29 negative.