WaPo editorial board: 'No excuse' for Clinton email practices
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The Washington Post editorial board Wednesday evening condemned Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBudowsky: Closing message for Democrats Election Countdown: Dems outraise GOP in final stretch | 2018 midterms already most expensive in history | What to watch in second Cruz-O'Rourke debate | Trump raises 0M for reelection | Why Dems fear Avenatti's approach GOP mocks Clinton after minor vehicle collision outside Mendendez campaign event MORE’s exclusive use of a private email server during her tenure as secretary of State, calling her actions an “inexcusable, willful disregard for the rules.”

The State Department inspector general released a new report Wednesday stating that Clinton broke several of the agency’s record-keeping policies, prompting the Post’s editorial board to call on the FBI to quickly finish its own investigation into the matter.

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“While not illegal behavior, it was disturbingly unmindful of the rules. In the middle of the presidential campaign, we urge the FBI to finish its own investigation soon, so all information about this troubling episode will be before the voters,” the editorial read.

The report showed Clinton and her senior aides did not comply with the State Department’s record-keeping policies, and the problems spread to other former secretaries and areas of the department. 

"The department’s email technology was archaic," the editorial board wrote. "Other staffers also used personal email, as did Secretary Colin Powell (2001-2005), without preserving the records. But there is no excuse for the way Ms. Clinton breezed through all the warnings and notifications."

By exclusively using a personal email address routed through a private server, Clinton circumvented policies designed to follow federal records laws and might have jeopardized official secrets, the Inspector General said in the report.

Clinton never requested permission to use the personal server, which was located at her New York home, and it “would not” have been approved, in part, because of “the security risks in doing so,” the watchdog agency wrote.

Additionally, Clinton “never demonstrated” to State Department security officials that her personal server or BlackBerry device “met minimum information security requirements.”

And Clinton’s decision not to use an official email department email address “is not an appropriate method” of preserving emails under the Federal Records Act, the inspector general said.

“Therefore, Secretary Clinton should have preserved any federal records she created and received on her personal account by printing and filing those records with the related files in the Office of the Secretary,” it said. “At a minimum, Secretary Clinton should have surrendered all emails dealing with Department business before leaving government service and, because she did not do so, she did not comply with the department’s policies that were implemented in accordance with the Federal Records Act."