CIA director expects, supports release of 9/11 report pages
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CIA Director John BrennanJohn Owen Brennan'Fox & Friends' co-host Kilmeade: Trump needs to 'clarify' comments on accepting foreign campaign intelligence Brennan slams Trump after ABC interview: Unfit to be president a 'gross understatement' Brennan slams Trump after ABC interview: Unfit to be president a 'gross understatement' MORE said on Saturday that he expects 28 redacted pages of a congressional report on 9/11 to be published and supports their release.

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"These 28 pages I believe are going to come out and I think it’s good that they come out, but people shouldn’t take them as evidence of Saudi complicity in the attacks," Brennan said in an interview with Saudi television station Arabiya TV, which was highlighted by Reuters.

Some lawmakers have been pressing for the release of the documents, which they argue show the existence of a Saudi support network for the hijackers involved in the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks. The 28 pages were cut from a report by the George W. Bush administration in the interest of national security.

Those critics say the vague wording in the report left open the possibility that less senior officials or other parts of the Saudi government could have played a role in the attacks.

While Brennan has maintained that Saudi Arabia and its officials were not involved, his support for the release of the documents is new.

Last month he said releasing the 28 pages of the report would be a mistake because they contain inaccurate, un-vetted information that could be used to inaccurately tie Saudi Arabia to the terror attacks.

"This chapter was kept out because of concerns about sensitive methods, investigative actions, and the investigation of 9/11 was still underway in 2002," Brennan said on NBC's "Meet the Press" in May. "I think there's a combination of things that are accurate and inaccurate."

On Saturday, Brennan reiterated that subsequent investigations by the 9/11 Commission found no evidence of Saudi involvement.

"These so-called 28 pages that were part of the joint inquiry that was published in 2002 just a year after 9/11 was a very preliminary review, trying to pull together bits and pieces of information reporting about who was responsible for 9/11," he said. 

“Subsequently the Sept. 11 commission looked very thoroughly at these allegations of Saudi involvement, Saudi government involvement and their finding, their conclusion was that there was no evidence to indicate that the Saudi government as an institution or Saudi senior officials individually had supported Sept. 11 attacks."

National Intelligence Director James Clapper was set to send his recommendations on the potential declassification to the White House in May and previously said that the decision to make the documents public could come as early as June.