A Republican member of the bipartisan group seeking a deal on background checks for gun owners said Sunday that lawmakers remain at odds.

“I don't think we're that close to a deal,” Sen. Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by PhRMA — Worries grow about political violence as midterms approach President Trump’s war on federal waste American patients face too many hurdles in regard to health-care access MORE (R-Okla.) said on Fox News Sunday.

Coburn is working with Sens. Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSchumer, Pelosi push Trump to back universal background check bill Sinema says she would back Kennedy in race against Markey Democrats threaten to withhold defense votes over wall MORE (D-N.Y.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinGOP signals unease with Barr's gun plan READ: Trump administration memo on background checks NRA says Trump administration memo a 'non-starter' MORE (D-W.Va.) and Mark KirkMark Steven Kirk The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Advocates push for EpiPens on flights after college student's mid-flight allergic reaction Funding the fight against polio MORE (R-Ill.) to craft language acceptable to both parties. The Washington Post reported Saturday that the group was “on the verge” of an agreement that would greatly increase the likelihood of gun-control legislation getting through the Senate.

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Coburn warned that any talk of registering gun owners would doom the effort.

“There absolutely will not be record-keeping on legitimate, law-abiding gun-owners in this country,” he said. “And if they want to eliminate the benefits of actually trying to prevent the sales to people who are mentally ill and to criminals, all they have to do is create a record-keeping. And that will kill this bill. So if you really want to improve it, you have to eliminate the record-keeping.”

President Obama has made the push for gun control a centerpiece of his second term agenda, calling for background checks and for Congress to ban the sales of assault weapons and high-capacity magazines. But background checks are seen as the most likely to pass Congress this year in the face of strong opposition from the nation's gun lobby.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyDemocrats press for action on election security The Hill's Morning Report — Biden steadies in third debate as top tier remains the same Overnight Defense: Dems grill Trump Army, Air Force picks | House chair subpoenas Trump Afghanistan negotiator | Trump officials release military aid to Ukraine MORE (D-Vt.) on Sunday said he was optimistic that a gun bill could pass Congress, but cautioned that he would only move legislation that had bipartisan support.