Ben CarsonBenjamin (Ben) Solomon CarsonSenior Trump administration official to leave post next week Harris, Ocasio-Cortez pitch bill to increase housing assistance for individuals with criminal record On The Money: House Democrats sue Treasury for Trump tax returns | Trump announces Fed board nominees | Dems press Carson over HUD hire who authored controversial posts on race | Consumer groups look to block Facebook cryptocurrency MORE on Thursday said lawmakers should reconsider how the Second Amendment works amid a raging debate over guns.

“Let’s put on the table — what is the reason for the Second Amendment?” he said on MSNBC. "And, is there a reason that we need to change those things right now?

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“Let’s put the data on the table and let’s talk about it like intelligent people rather than getting in our respective corners and hurling insults. We’ll never solve anything that way.”

Carson said the fight over gun control remains heated because of the passion it invokes on both sides.

“I think the people who are protesting certainly feel that they are absolutely, 100 percent right,” he said of Wednesday’s Democratic House sit-in to demand action on gun control legislation.

“But of course the people on the other side feel that they’re 100 percent right too," the former GOP presidential candidate added. "That’s why we need to get back to a point of having civil discussion.”

Democrats on Wednesday seized the House floor with a dramatic protest spotlighting gun violence and their efforts to restrict gun sales.

Republicans gaveled the chamber into recess and shut off House cameras, leaving protesters addressing a largely empty room.

Democrats then used social media platforms to keep pressure on their GOP counterparts, vowing “No bill, no break” until a vote on new firearms regulations.

Participants on Thursday afternoon ended their demonstration over 24 hours later, leaving Democrats’ next move unclear after Republicans adjourned early for the Independence Day recess.

Republicans and Democrats are sharply divided over how the nation should address the worst mass shooting in its history earlier this month.

Forty-nine people died and 53 more were injured when a gunman opened fire on June 12 at Pulse nightclub in Orlando.

Democrats are now seeking a vote on legislation to prevent individuals on federal terrorism watch lists from purchasing guns.

Republicans insist the measure could impede Second Amendment rights by keeping the wrongly accused people from buying firearms.

During his presidential campaign, Carson largely spoke against stricter gun control.
 
He said last year tighter gun laws would not have prevented the June 2015 mass shooting in Charleston, S.C.
 
"The heart of the matter is not guns," he said last June. "The heart of the matter is the heart, the heart and soul of people."
 
Carson also said in October he approves of kindergarten teachers and other school administrators having access to guns as a form of protection.