Sens. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyCOVID-19 relief debate stalls in Senate amid Democratic drama First Black secretary of Senate sworn in Press: The big loser: The Republican Party MORE (D-Vt.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate rejects Sanders minimum wage hike Murkowski votes with Senate panel to advance Haaland nomination OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Interior reverses Trump policy that it says restricted science | Collins to back Haaland's Interior nomination | Republicans press Biden environment nominee on Obama-era policy MORE (R-Maine) will unveil legislation on Monday aimed at curbing the illegal trafficking of firearms.

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Collins’s spokesman Kevin Kelley told The Hill in an email that details about the bill were coming “shortly.” 

It’s unclear how the legislation would differ from Leahy’s previously introduced bill which would make it easier for federal law enforcement officials to crack down on so-called “straw purchasers.” 

But the news that Collins is on board with Leahy’s effort is the latest evidence of a growing bipartisan consensus to take at least some steps to stem the nation’s epidemic of gun violence.

Leahy’s earlier bill would add a new provision to the criminal code to make it illegal to purchase firearms on behalf of persons who are prohibited from owning them. Federal prosecutors now have little legal basis to file charges against gun traffickers and often must rely on technical paperwork violations to build their cases.

Last week, the Senate Judiciary Committee was scheduled to mark up Leahy’s legislation, Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinDemocrats worry Senate will be graveyard for Biden agenda Pro-Choice Caucus asks Biden to remove abortion fund restrictions from 2022 budget China has already infiltrated America's institutions MORE’s (D-Calif.) renewal of the federal assault weapons ban, a measure introduced by Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerTrump administration halting imports of cotton, tomatoes from Uighur region of China Biden inaugural committee to refund former senator's donation due to foreign agent status Questions and answers about the Electoral College challenges MORE (D-Calif.) to increase federal grants for school safety, and Sen. Charles SchumerChuck SchumerLawmakers demand changes after National Guard troops at Capitol sickened from tainted food Ron Johnson forces reading of 628-page Senate coronavirus relief bill on floor Senate panel splits along party lines on Becerra MORE’s (D-N.Y.) bill to expand background checks on private gun sales.

The mark-up was delayed until this week, to give Schumer more time to work out a deal with Republicans, who say expanded background checks can’t include any semblance of a national registry to track gun purchases.

Lawmakers have resumed debate over gun control in the aftermath of December’s tragic shooting at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn.

While President Obama is pushing for bans on assault weapons and high-capacity clips as well as mandatory background checks, it is uncertain which of these measures can pass. The nation’s gun lobby and GOP lawmakers have vowed to wage a fierce fight against any new gun ownership restrictions.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidBiden turns focus to next priority with infrastructure talks How to pass legislation in the Senate without eliminating the filibuster Who is the Senate parliamentarian and why is she important? MORE (D-Nev.) has said however that he would allow a floor vote on any legislation which passes through committee. And on Sunday, Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerThree ways James Kvaal can lead postsecondary education forward Boehner book jacket teases slams against Cruz, Trump Cruz hits back at Boehner for telling him to 'go f--- yourself' MORE (R-Ohio) said the House would consider any gun-control measures passed by the Senate.