NY Times: Trump 'right' about Ginsburg's comments
© Getty Images

The New York Times's editorial board says Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpMnuchin knocks Greta Thunberg's activism: Study economics and then 'come back' to us The Hill's Morning Report - House prosecutes Trump as 'lawless,' 'corrupt' What to watch for on Day 3 of Senate impeachment trial MORE is "right" that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's criticisms of him are inappropriate.

"Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg needs to drop the political punditry and the name-calling," the newspaper said in an editorial published Wednesday.

ADVERTISEMENT

Ginsburg earlier this week slammed the presumptive GOP presidential nominee, saying she "can't imagine what the country would be" like if Trump were to serve as president. The justice also called Trump a "faker" who "has no consistency about him."

Trump said in response it was "highly inappropriate" that a Supreme Court judge get involved with a political campaign.

The New York Times said Ginsburg's comments show why Supreme Court justices normally remain silent during presidential campaigns. 

"In this election cycle in particular, the potential of a new president to affect the balance of the court has taken on great importance, with the vacancy left by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia," the paper's editorial board said.

"As Justice Ginsburg pointed out, other justices are nearing an age when retirement would not be surprising. That makes it vital that the court remain outside the presidential process."

The newspaper also slammed Trump for his attacks on Gonzalo Curiel, the federal judge overseeing a fraud lawsuit against Trump University. Trump has said the Indiana-born judge would be biased against him because of Curiel's Mexican heritage.

"Mr. Trump’s hands, of course, are far from clean on the matter of judicial independence," the paper said.

"All of which makes it only more baffling that Justice Ginsburg would choose to descend toward his level and call her own commitment to impartiality into question. Washington is more than partisan enough without the spectacle of a Supreme Court justice flinging herself into the mosh pit."