Vice President Biden and the Obama administration still hope to pass a federal assault weapons ban, Biden said Wednesday.

"I'm still pushing that it pass — we are still pushing that it pass. The same thing was told to me when the first assault weapons ban in '94 was attached to the Biden crime bill, that it couldn't possibly pass," Biden said Wednesday in an interview with NPR. "It was declared dead several times."

ADVERTISEMENT

Earlier in the week Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - CDC in limbo on J&J vax verdict; Rep. Brady retiring Biden to tap Erika Moritsugu as new Asian American and Pacific Islander liaison White House races clock to beat GOP attacks MORE (D-Nev.) said that a proposal to reinstitute a federal assault weapons ban would not be included in a gun control bill the Senate plans to vote on soon. Reid said the proposal, which Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinLawmakers react to guilty verdict in Chauvin murder trial: 'Our work is far from done' Senate Democrats call on Biden to restore oversight of semiautomatic and sniper rifle exports Overnight Defense: Army moves to combat sexual crimes | Eight West Point cadets expelled | Democratic senators want to restrict F-35 sale to UAE MORE (D-Calif.) introduced, would have weighed down the rest of the gun control bill. New gun conttrol legislation, especially an assault weapons ban, faces strong opposition in the Republican-controlled House of Representatives.

President Obama has urged Congress to pass legislation reinstating a ban on assault weapons.

Obama also charged Biden with leading a Congressional task force to make recommendations for reducing gun violence.

Biden has been a staunch proponent of passing new gun laws. He also served as chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee in 1994 when the panel considered a crime bill that included a 10-year assault weapons ban.

"I believe that the vast majority of the American people agree with us, the vast majority of gun owners agree with us, that military-style assault weapons are — these are weapons of war; they don't belong in the street," Biden said. "And [in] the recent decision declaring the right of someone to own a weapon in their home for self-protection, Justice [Antonin] Scalia acknowledged that you can constitutionally ban certain types of weapons. So I'm not going to give up on this."

The effort to pass new gun laws is in response to a shooting massacre last December at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut that resulted in 28 dead, including 20 young children.

On Tuesday White House chief of staff Denis McDonoughDenis Richard McDonoughOvernight Defense: Biden officially rolls out Afghanistan withdrawal plan | Probe finds issues with DC Guard helicopter use during June protests Congress must address the toxic exposure our veterans have endured Veterans shouldn't have to wait for quality care MORE said the White House would "find the votes" to pass the ban.